BQ-Heg-Good

BQ-Heg-Good - 092ffd2c7b4e5a2e948b86099dae7da1af95ad7e...

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092ffd2c7b4e5a2e948b86099dae7da1af95ad7e Dartmouth 2K9 1 BQ PP 1 BQ Lab – Heg Good 1
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092ffd2c7b4e5a2e948b86099dae7da1af95ad7e Dartmouth 2K9 2 BQ PP 2 1AC – Heg Good U.S hegemony solves extinction --- multiple scenarios Kagan, Senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and senior transatlantic fellow at the German Marshall Fund, ‘07 (Robert Kagan, senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and senior transatlantic fellow at the German Marshall Fund, 9-07, “End of Dreams, Return of History,” Stanford University Policy Review, http://www.hoover.org/publications/policyreview/8552512.html) This is a good thing, and it should continue to be a primary goal of American foreign policy to perpetuate this relatively benign international configuration of power. The unipolar order with the U nited S tates as the predominant power is unavoidably riddled with flaws and contradictions. It inspires fears and jealousies. The United States is not immune to error, like all other nations, and because of its size and importance in the international system those errors are magnified and take on greater significance than the errors of less powerful nations. Compared to the ideal Kantian international order, in which all the world 's powers would be peace-loving equals, conducting themselves wisely, prudently, and in strict obeisance to international law, the unipolar system is both dangerous and unjust. Compared to any plausible alternative in the real world, however, it is relatively stable and less likely to produce a major war between great powers. It is also comparatively benevolent, from a liberal perspective, for it is more conducive to the principles of economic and political liberalism that Americans and many others value. American predominance does not stand in the way of progress toward a better world, therefore. It stands in the way of regression toward a more dangerous world. The choice is not between an American-dominated order and a world that looks like the European Union. The future international order will be shaped by those who have the power to shape it. The leaders of a post-American world will not meet in Brussels but in Beijing, Moscow, and Washington. The return of great powers and great games If the world is marked by the persistence of unipolarity, it is nevertheless also being shaped by the reemergence of competitive national ambitions of the kind that have shaped human affairs from time immemorial. During the Cold War, this historical tendency of great powers to jostle with one another for status and influence as well as for wealth and power was largely suppressed by the two superpowers and their rigid bipolar order. Since the end of the Cold War, the United States has not been powerful enough, and probably could never be powerful enough, to suppress by itself the normal ambitions of nations. This does not mean the world has returned to multipolarity, since none of the large powers is in range of competing with the superpower for global
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This note was uploaded on 12/20/2010 for the course K 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at UMass Lowell.

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BQ-Heg-Good - 092ffd2c7b4e5a2e948b86099dae7da1af95ad7e...

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