DDI09.SS.Growth.Wave2

DDI09.SS.Growth.Wave - Growth Good/Bad Sean Robinson Dartmouth 2K9 1 Index Anna Seriously guys there is lit on EVERYTHING Like I read an article

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Growth Good/Bad Dartmouth 2K9 Sean Robinson 2 DeDev 1NC Studies prove that complex societies inevitably collapse due to lack of returns from innovation – the infinite growth is impossible and the attempts to innovate out of it guarantees inevitable collapse Deborah Mackenzie 09 – BBC Correspondant. Quotes Joe Tainter - an archaeologist at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, and author of the 1988 book The Collapse of Complex Societies, and Yaneer Bar-Yam, head of the New England Complex Systems Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts 4/5/2008 (“Are WE doomed?” Ebsco) DOOMSDAY . The end of civilisation. Literature and film abound with tales of plague, famine and wars which ravage the planet, leaving a few survivors scratching out a primitive existence amid the ruins . Every civilisation in history has collapsed , after all. Why should ours be any different ? Doomsday scenarios typically feature a knockout blow : a massive asteroid, all-out nuclear war or a catastrophic pandemic (see "Will a pandemic bring down civilisation?"). Yet there is another chilling possibility: what if the very nature of civilisation means that ours, like all the others, is destined to collapse sooner or later ? A few researchers have been making such claims for year s. Disturbingly, recent insights from fields such as complexity theory s uggest that they are right. It appears that once a society develops beyond a certain level of complexity it becomes increasingly fragi le. Eventually , it reaches a point at which even a relatively minor disturbance can bring everything crashing down . Some say we have already reached this point, and that it is time to start thinking about how we might manage collapse . Others insist it is not yet too late, and that we can - we must - act now to keep disaster at bay . Environmental mismanagement History is not on our side. Think of Sumeria, of ancient Egypt and of the Maya. In his 2005 best-seller Collapse, Jared Diamond of the University of California, Los Angeles, blamed environmental mismanagement for the fall of the Mayan civilisation and others, and warned that we might be heading the same way unless we choose to stop destroying our environmental support systems. Lester Brown of the Earth Policy Institute in Washington DC agrees. He has long argued that governments must pay more attention to vital environmental resources. "It's not about saving the planet. It's about saving civilisation," he says. Others think our problems run deeper. >From the moment our ancestors started to settle down and build cities, we have had to find solutions to the problems that success brings. "For the past 10,000 years, problem solving has produced increasing complexity in human societies," says Joseph Tainter, an archaeologist at Utah State University, Logan, and author of the 1988 book The Collapse of Complex Societies. If crops fail because rain is patchy, build irrigation canals. When they silt up, organise dredging crews. When the bigger crop yields lead to a bigger population, build more canals. When there are too many for ad hoc repairs, install a management bureaucracy, and tax people
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This note was uploaded on 12/20/2010 for the course K 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at UMass Lowell.

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DDI09.SS.Growth.Wave - Growth Good/Bad Sean Robinson Dartmouth 2K9 1 Index Anna Seriously guys there is lit on EVERYTHING Like I read an article

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