Annotations--The Lord of the Rings as Elegy by Patrice Hannon.pdf - Instructions For this assignment you will annotate an article Please read the

Annotations--The Lord of the Rings as Elegy by Patrice Hannon.pdf

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Instructions: For this assignment, you will annotate an article. Please read the instructions and follow each step carefully. There are three steps. Turn on Track Changes under the Review tab in Word before you begin. Be sure your Track Changes shows All Markup not just a Simple Markup. Step 1: Predict and preview After reading the title and glancing over the text and author’s biography (below), what do you think the text will be about? What do you understand about the text from the title? What do you know already about this topic? What questions do you have about the text? Enter your response to the preview here: Step 2: Read, summarize, and annotate As you read the article, use the Track Changes function to annotate the text. 1. Double click the last word of a paragraph, and then click the New Comment button under the Review tab to add a comment box. Type your one sentence summary (paraphrase) of the paragraph in the box. Summarize every paragraph in the essay. Group short paragraphs of the same topic together for summarizing. 2. What words do you not understand? Define them directly in the text next to the word. Only put the definition for the word in its exact context (not all the definitions). 3. Annotate the text. Use the functions in Microsoft Word to highlight sections or words and underline sentences or sections that are important, just like you would if you were annotating a hard copy of the essay. Use the following key to annotate your text: Highlight the main ideas of paragraphs, including the thesis Underline supporting details or interesting quotes/facts/ideas Bold any counterarguments. If you are handwriting, you can circle the counterarguments. The Lord of the Rings as Elegy” by Patrice Hannon “‘I will tell you the tale of Tinuviel,’ said Strider, ‘[...] It is a fair tale, though it is sad, as are all the tales of Middle-earth, and yet it may lift up your hearts.’” J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings i “By 1918 all but one of my close friends were dead.” J.R.R. Tolkien, Foreword to The Lord of the Rings ii The Lord of the Rings is a story of loss and longing, punctuated by moments of humor and terror and heroic action but on the whole a lament for a world albeit a fictional world that has passed even as we seem to catch a last glimpse of it flickering and fading, disappearing in the mist like the ship carrying the Ring-bearer over the sea to the West. In the very first chapter, after Bilbo has vanished with the help of the magic ring during his birthday party, a surprising note of finality abruptly ends the comic scene: “he was never seen by any hobbit in Hobbiton again” (FR 40). This “never again” moves us out of the present of the birthday party to a point where the scene is long past, reminding us that we are not there with Bilbo but looking back at the day of the party from a great distance. The narrator soon repeats this gesture:
The second disappearance of Mr. Bilbo Baggins was discussed in Hobbiton, and indeed all over the Shire, for a year and a day, and was remembered much longer than that. [ . ..]

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