DDI-CJ-Head-Start-Neg

DDI-CJ-Head-Start-Neg - Dartmouth 2K9 1 Index Last printed...

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2a6fa5b8f38641275c56c294710a109dbc1e4a32.doc Dartmouth 2K9 1 Index Last printed 1
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2a6fa5b8f38641275c56c294710a109dbc1e4a32.doc Dartmouth 2K9 2 States CP Text: The fifty states should substantially increase funding to Head Start and pre-kindergarten programs that supplement Head Start. States can fund Head Start programs or their equivalent National Center for Children in Poverty June 16 20 09 (The National Center for   Children in Poverty (NCCP) is the nation’s leading public policy center dedicated to promoting the economic security, health, and well-being of America’s low-income families and children. June 16 2009 http://www.nccp.org/profiles/ US_profile_20.html ) 20 states set the income eligibility limit for child care subsidies at or above 200% FPL. [2008] 2 10 states increased the child care subsidy reimbursement rate within the last two years to be at or above the 75th percentile of the market rate. [2008] 3 22 states annually redetermine eligibility for child care subsidies, which can promote consistent caregiving relationships. [2008] 4 17 states supplement Early Head Start with state or other federal funds . [2008] 5 43 states fund a pre-kindergarten program and/or supplement Head Start. [2008] 6 Last printed 2
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2a6fa5b8f38641275c56c294710a109dbc1e4a32.doc Dartmouth 2K9 3 States CP And states are comparatively better at education Grissmer and Flanagan, Brookings Papers on Education Policy , 01 (David Grissmer and Ann Flanagan, Brookings Papers on Education Policy, “Searching for Indirect Evidence for the Effects of Statewide Reforms,” 2001, http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/brookings_papers_on_education_policy/v2001/2001.1grissmer.html ) States are the primary policymakers in several important areas of K-12 education. States , on average, provide approximately one-half of educational funding to school districts. Thus they are instrumental in determining how much is spent on education and how that money is used to reduce inequity in funding among school districts. States also are instrumental in determining who teaches, what is taught, and the conditions for teaching. These state policies include setting teacher certification standards, establishing maximum class-size and minimum graduation requirements, setting educational standards in subjects, and establishing methods of assessing student performance and methods of accountability for teachers, schools, and school districts. States also influence the extent of early education through kindergarten and preschool regulations and, in some states, through subsidizing prekindergarten for lower income families. Given their dominant role in educational funding and regulation, states not surprisingly have been the primary initiators of the latest wave of educational reform starting in the mid-1980s. 1 Perhaps the most widespread initiative is a systemic reform movement that includes defining educational standards, aligning curriculum and teacher professional development to the standards, and having some form of
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DDI-CJ-Head-Start-Neg - Dartmouth 2K9 1 Index Last printed...

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