LO-needle-exchange-neg-blocks

LO-needle-exchange-neg-blocks - DDI LO 2009 DUSTIN FILE...

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DDI LO 2009 FILE NAME DUSTIN TOURNAMENT NAME States CP extensions and Politics Links peace through superior firepower 1
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DDI LO 2009 FILE NAME DUSTIN TOURNAMENT NAME AT—Too expensive Syringes cost a quarter Chapman, journalist for Chicago Tribune, cited in 1AC, 09 Steve Chapman, journalist for Chicago Tribune, 6/17/2009, Making the Wrong trade on AIDS , <http://www.creators.com/opinion/steve-chapman/making-the-wrong-trade-on-aids.html Being a journalist, I'm no expert on making money. But you don't have to be Warren Buffett to recognize one way to get rich: Find someone who will give you $600,000 if you give them 25 cents . A few swaps like that, and you're a permanent resident of Easy Street. You might assume that no such deal exists, and that if it did, no one would pass it up. You would be wrong. This advantageous exchange is available anytime our leaders in Washington want to take it. But so far, they've refused. The reason for their reluctance is that the trade involves something unsavory: illegal drug use . More than 1 million people in this country regularly inject themselves with heroin, cocaine and other prohibited pharmaceuticals . Many of them also reuse and share their hypodermic syringes. All it takes is one instance of sharing with someone carrying the HIV to create another AIDS victim — and possibly several, since those infected can transmit the virus to their spouses, sexual partners and even children. About 22 percent of all AIDS infections are attributable to intravenous drug use. This is an incurable and lethal disease, and an expensive one. Caring for someone infected with the virus costs about $25,000 a year, or $600,000 over the typical patient's life. What would it take to prevent it? A sterile new syringe, which sells for about a quarter. peace through superior firepower 2
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DDI LO 2009 FILE NAME DUSTIN TOURNAMENT NAME AT—Federal Key 1. Their Knol card says federal laws prevents transportation of syringes in and out of states is illegal. Each state that deregulates for private pharmaceutical companies to sell syringes over the counter is not inter-state. 2. 1NC Knol card says states have empirically amended federal restrictions and allowed pharmaceutical companies to sell syringes. This makes all their arguments non-unique. 3. Lifting federal ban isn’t key—Knol says that Connecticut has gone around the law. Even if the CP doesn’t get around the law, neither does the plan because they don’t repeal the federal ban. peace through superior firepower 3
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DDI LO 2009 FILE NAME DUSTIN TOURNAMENT NAME Solvency—states Their federal key warrant conclude NEG—deregulating local pharmacy sales solves Knol , online encyclopedia, 1AC author, 08 ( Knol.com, an online encyclopedia resource, written by Lina “Legal Issues Surrounding Syringe Exchange Programs” July 28 2008 http://knol.google.com/k/lina/legal-issues-surrounding-syringe/18lnh961rb830/6#) In the United States, 48 states and the District of Columbia have laws that restrict the possession or distribution
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This note was uploaded on 12/20/2010 for the course K 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at UMass Lowell.

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LO-needle-exchange-neg-blocks - DDI LO 2009 DUSTIN FILE...

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