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Lecture 4 - General Physics FORCES AND NEWTONS LAWS OF...

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General Physics 9/12/2010 A. Brahmia 1 FORCES AND NEWTON’S LAWS OF MOTION Newton’s Laws of Motion Dynamics is the study of the causes of motion. The basic causes of motion can be explained by using Newton’s three laws of motion. The net force refers to the vector sum of all the forces acting on an object. The magnitude and direction of the net force is determined by using the method of vector addition. FORCES AND NEWTON’S LAWS OF MOTION... Inertia and Mass Inertia refers to the tendency of an object to resist any change in its state of motion. Inertia is measured by measuring an object’s mass. The SI unit of inertia and mass is kilogram (kg) Newton’s First Law of Motion An object continues in a state of rest or in a state of motion at constant speed along a straight line, unless compelled to change that state by a net force.
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General Physics 9/12/2010 A. Brahmia 2 FORCES AND NEWTON’S LAWS OF MOTION... Newton’s Second Laws of Motion Newton’s second law of motion refers to an object in motion when a net force does not equal zero. The net force ( F ) will cause an object to accelerate or decelerate. The rate of acceleration ( a ) is directly proportional to the magnitude of the net force and inversely proportional to the object’s mass ( m ). The SI unit of force is the newton ( N ). m F a a m F FORCES AND NEWTON’S LAWS OF MOTION... Newton’s Third Laws Newton’s third law is the “ action-reaction ” law with which most students are familiar. The action force and the reaction force are equal and opposite but do not act on the same object.
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