FemininityNotes

FemininityNotes - Sigmund Freud, Femininity The nature of...

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Sigmund Freud, “Femininity” The nature of femininity is framed as a “riddle” against which “people have knocked their heads” over the course of history. This, he claims, is a problem for all people, men and women. The distinction “male or female” is, indeed, the first distinction he believes we make when we encounter someone. He cites the straightforward accounts of biology to be misleading, noting that the female retains the “male sexual apparatus…in atrophied state.” In each individual, moreover, he claims masculine and feminine traits (physical and psychological) are mixed. As to these traits, “You cannot give the concepts of ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’ and new connotation. The distinction is not a psychological one; when you say ‘masculine,’ you usually mean ‘active,’ and when you say ‘feminine,’ you usually mean ‘passive.’” He uses an interpretation of sexual characteristics as quick evidence for this popular view. He admits, however, that, “Even the functions of rearing and caring for the young, which strike us as feminine par excellence, are not invariably attached to the female sex in animals.” Even in the sphere of human behavior, he adds, the neat
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FemininityNotes - Sigmund Freud, Femininity The nature of...

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