RepublicBookVNotes

RepublicBookVNotes - Book V Republic Socrates is prepared...

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Book V, Republic Socrates is prepared to discuss the application of justice to the real world, but his fellows insist he instead talks about sex and the family in the imagined city. Socrates is chagrined, in no small part because he claims the key reasons why his city remains impossible are those related to gender and children. He begins by arguing that women must be admitted in to politics, and that female guardians ought serve alongside men. He asks, “Do we believe the females of the guardian dogs must guard the things the males guard along with them and hunt with them, and do the rest in common; or must they stay indoors as though they were incapacitated as a result of bearing and rearing…?” His associates agree women ought be the held to the same standard and given the same education as men. Note that his fellows are invested in embodied differences and determinisms – they balk most clearly at the presence of nude females at the gymnasium, even after agreeing to the above. Socrates immediately contests this biological determinism, and argues, “there is no part of a city’s governors which belongs to woman because she’s woman, or to man because he’s man; but the natures are scattered alike among both animals;
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RepublicBookVNotes - Book V Republic Socrates is prepared...

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