09_12_Projectile_2

09_12_Projectile_2 - Newtons 2nd Law It tells us how much...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
9/12 Free Fall, Projectile Motion / Text sections and 1.6-8 , 3.1-2, and 4.3 / HW Do the suggested problems below No HW will be collected this week or Monday / Lab: “Vector Exercise” Let’s talk about this / Suggested problems: 3-25, 27, 30 Use concepts, not equations!!!
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
g is not the “accel. of gravity” g is always a “field strength”, not an acceleration! It tells us how much force (in Newtons) is on an object and depends on the object’s mass. Weight = mass x g An object in free fall (or in projectile motion) has only the weight force on it as nothing else is touching it.
Background image of page 2
g is not the “accel. of gravity”
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Newtons 2nd Law It tells us how much acceleration an object has and depends on the objects mass as well as the force on the object. acceleration = force mass Be careful: g = 9.8N/kg and for free fall a = 9.8m/s 2 but it is dangerous to think of g as an acceleration. More on this later. a = W/m = mg/m = g a = g in number, not in concept! Projectile Motion Example: An object is thrown straight up with a velocity of 4m/s. The acceleration is 9.8m/s 2 directed down. How long is the object in the air? How high does it get? What is its velocity when it gets back to the ground?...
View Full Document

Page1 / 4

09_12_Projectile_2 - Newtons 2nd Law It tells us how much...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online