chapter 2 - Chapter 2 THE CONSTITUTION 1 Shayss Rebellion,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 2 THE CONSTITUTION 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Shays’s Rebellion, 1786 Widespread economic problems among farmers at the end of the Revolutionary War Nonpayment of taxes and debts led to foreclosure proceedings and imprisonment for debt. Farmers in western Massachusetts took up arms to prevent courts from meeting Armed farmers led by Captain Daniel Shays forced the ill- equipped state militia to withdraw. By the spring of 1787, special armed forces recruited from the Boston area defeated the rebels. 2
Background image of page 2
Aftermath of Shays’s Rebellion Shays’ Rebellion reinforced the fears of national leaders about the dangers of ineffective state governments and of popular democracy out of control. In this climate of crisis, a call was issued to meet in Philadelphia to correct defects in the Articles of Confederation. Delegates to the Philadelphia convention were instructed to propose revisions for the Articles of Confederation, but they wrote an entirely new constitution instead. 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Political Theory and Practices of the Revolutionary Era Conflicts over the meaning of democracy and liberty in the new nation Initially, the Revolution was fought to preserve an existing way of life. Traditional rights of life, liberty, and property seemed to be threatened by British policies on trade and taxation. The Revolution was inspired by a concern for liberty together with the development of sentiments for popular sovereignty and political equality. 4
Background image of page 4
Basic Concepts of American Republican Democracy Basic concepts in the Revolutionary era Liberty  —  the preservation of traditional rights against the intrusions of government Popular sovereignty  —  assumes that ultimate political authority belongs to the people Political equality  —  refers to decision making where each person carries the same weight. 5
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Prelude to the Declaration of Independence Delegates to the Second Continental Congress did not originally have independence in mind. By the spring of 1776, delegates concluded that separation and independence were inescapable. A special committee was appointed to draft a declaration of independence. The Declaration of Independence was unanimously adopted by the Second Continental Congress on July 4, 1776. 6
Background image of page 6
Thomas Jefferson’s Contributions The Declaration of Independence was primarily the work of Jefferson. Jefferson was heavily influenced by the writings of John Locke, especially The Second Treatise on Government . Jefferson’s ideas are so familiar to us today that it is easy to miss their revolutionary importance. 7
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Key Ideas in the Declaration of Independence Legitimate government could only be established by the people and governed with their consent. Human beings possess rights that cannot be
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/21/2010 for the course POLITICAL 1 taught by Professor Melvinaaron during the Fall '08 term at Los Angeles City College.

Page1 / 35

chapter 2 - Chapter 2 THE CONSTITUTION 1 Shayss Rebellion,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online