chapter 12 - Chapter 12 THE PRESIDENT 1 The Reagan...

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1 Chapter 12 THE PRESIDENT
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2 The Reagan Revolution Reagan and the modern presidency The times were ripe for Ronald Reagan’s brand of leadership in the 1980s. Polls showed that people were eager for change. When Ronald Reagan took office in 1981, he interpreted his landslide victory as a mandate to pursue sweeping changes.
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3 Reagan’s Program for Economic Recovery Tax and budget proposals were given top priority in the proposals Reagan announced in his Program for Economic Recovery . Reagan proposed the largest tax cut in American history (directed mainly at upper-income groups and corporations. He proposed the steepest rise in defense spending in peacetime American history.
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4 The Reagan Offensive Democratic opposition looked formidable. Controlled a large majority of seats in the House of Representatives Only a slim Republican majority in the Senate The Reagan offensive —a skilled and shrewd deal maker Cultivated friendly relations with members of Congress from both parties Worked to build up his popularity with the public Exerted political pressure in conservative areas in the South with Democratic members of Congress
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5 The Politics of Reagan’s Electoral Victory Reaction The administration’s tax bill passed easily in the Senate (72-20) and received a majority of the votes in the House of Representatives. He was successful in the House primarily because of the support of southern conservative Democrats. Reagan got most of what he wanted in domestic budget cuts and the defense buildup. Politicians were impressed by the scale of Reagan’s electoral victory and by the height of his popularity.
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6 Effects of the Reagan Revolution Effects The Reagan Revolution had profound effects, not all of them positive. Although some economic growth occurred, the legacies of the 1980s also included: A massive increase in the size of the debt Dramatic increases in the scale of income and wealth inequality
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7 Personality Politics Versus the Structure of American Politics Despite the long-term problems, the Reagan Revolution was a huge political success. An understanding of the Reagan Revolution requires that we understand not just the personality, style, and effectiveness of Reagan as president but also the governmental, political, and structural contexts within which he operated (just as with other presidents).
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The Expanding Presidency There has been an obvious increase in presidential responsibilities, burdens, power, and impact since the nation’s founding. The Founders’ conception of the office of president was much more limited than what we see in the modern presidency. The vague language of the Constitution has been
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This note was uploaded on 12/21/2010 for the course POLITICAL 1 taught by Professor Melvinaaron during the Fall '08 term at Los Angeles City College.

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chapter 12 - Chapter 12 THE PRESIDENT 1 The Reagan...

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