Lecture 11 12

Lecture 11 12 - Optical Technology for the WAN RWA 2.3...

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Optical Technology for the WAN: RWA usc-den-ee555-spr09-silvester-§2.3 1 2.3 Optical Technology for the WAN: Routing and Wavelength Assignment (RWA) 2.3.1 Passive Star Topology Simplest optical topology. Mostly useful in LAN implementation. Embed a logical topology on top of optical layer e.g. n -node ring or grid. A. Can use a single wavelength and share using a multiple access technique (time multiplexed: fixed TDM or random access) to share among the logical connections. B. Alternately can use different wavelength for each logical connection (called a lightpath). Optical Technology for the WAN: RWA usc-den-ee555-spr09-silvester-§2.3 2 (material from overhead camera notes follows)
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Optical Technology for the WAN: RWA usc-den-ee555-spr09-silvester-§2.3 3 2.3.2 Richer Topology Example – Bidirectional WDM Ring metro ring MA MD MC MB R2 R1 R3 R4 MA-MD are DWDM ROADMs and associated OLTs. R1-R4 are IP routers that we wish to connect up over the metro ring. There are several options for Layer 3 (IP) topology and they are independent of the underlying optical layer topology. Let us Optical Technology for the WAN: RWA usc-den-ee555-spr09-silvester-§2.3 4 assume that the router to router connections are to be single 10G connections (we will look at the link format later) and we will compute how much traffic the design can handle. For each design we will determine: 1. Maximum number of wavelengths used (on any segment), max w 2. Average lightpath length in optical hops, L h 3. Total number of lightpaths, n L 4. Total number of wave segments needed, ws n ( L L n h = ) 5. Average path length in router hops, R h 6. Number of router ports needed (major cost factor), RP n 7. For a given traffic pattern (uniform), maximum IP traffic that the network can handle, max γ 8. Router load in (packets per second) is also a key factor. So look at the total traffic passing through each router.
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Optical Technology for the WAN: RWA usc-den-ee555-spr09-silvester-§2.3 5 Case 1: A bi-directional ring - The connection R1-R2 is implemented as a wave (on λ 1 say) on the optical link from MA to MB (and on the reverse link from MB to MA).
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This note was uploaded on 12/22/2010 for the course EE 555 taught by Professor Silvester during the Fall '08 term at USC.

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Lecture 11 12 - Optical Technology for the WAN RWA 2.3...

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