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Pond_Water_Key-1

Pond_Water_Key-1 - P©N® WHERE KEY& SAMPLE ORGANISMS IN...

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Unformatted text preview: P©N® WHERE KEY & SAMPLE ORGANISMS IN AQUATIC PHYLA Robin Fautley 10/15/07 Santa Rosa Junior College Biology 1a. 1b. 3a. 3b. 5a. 5b. Pond Water Key Organism contains green, yellow—green, blue-green, or yellow-brown pigments (an alga). 2 Organism lacks above pigments, may have brown or black pigments. (Heterotrophs, may have consumed algae and appear pigmented) 7 2a. Pigments blue-green or olive-green, spread out throughout cytoplasm (lacks chloroplasts); cells very small, features difficult to distinguish. (a bacterium; prokaryote) Cyanobacteria p. S 2b. Not as above. Organism may be single-celled or muftice 'ular. (organelles may be evident; eukaryotic') 3 Cells grass-green; move by means of flagella; may change shape as it moves; red eyespot may be evident. (single cell) " Euglenoids p. 6 Not as above. If grass-green or has flagella, no red eyespot present. 4 4a. Pigments grass green; may be unicellular, colonial, or filamentous. Cell wall not sculpted silica. May have flagella. QW” ______‘ Green Algae p. 7 w an; m‘ a???“ fig; “m.— A |.t.a.\.tt~._ 4b. Not as above. 5 Unicellular organisms with distinct symmetry (may be bilateral or circular); pigments if visible are yellow~brown or yellow-green; cell wall sculpted silica; lacks flagella or cilia. 6a. Cells with yellow-green pigments. May be colonial or unicellular. Golden Algae p. 9 6b. Yellow-brown and flagellated organisms, r.< fb opaque; often with two distinct segments. W Dinoflagellates p. 10 I: Santa Rosa Junior College Biology 7b. 9a 9b. 11a 11b. 13a. 13b. Unicellular protist, usually lacks distinct pigments. 8 Multicellular animal, may be pigmented. 11 8a. Single—celled protist, possesses pseudopods, and has a fonm that varies, / « _; or possesses a silica i’ , -.,-"v" or calcareous cell wall. .f '- , Amoeboids p. 11 8b. Protists lacking above features. Cells with distinct shape (or symmetry), does not have a silica or calcareous cell wall. 9 Single-celled protist, moves by means of cilia. Ciliates p. 12 Single-celled protist, moves by means of flagella. ' 10 10a. Sin gle«celled protist, lacks pigments; usually small and rapid moving. Flagellates p. 13 10b. Single—celled protist, opaque yellow-brownfi - ’ {v pigments; moves by means of flagella; often \LEZ; 7 with two distinct segments. ,r' Dinoflagellates p.10 I .l Worm-like, multicellular animal. 12 Not worm-like, if resembling a wonn then with cilia at one end. 14 12a. Slender worm tapered at both ends; no distinct head end; lacks segmentation; whip-like movement, small. 4' Roundworms p. 14 gsfr‘iw-esme 12b. Worm-like but either flattened or segmented. May have undulating movement. 13 Flattened worms often with eyespots at head end; lacks suckers at each end. Flatworms p. 15 Worms with segments; relatively large; if flattened, then it has suckers at each end; may have undulating movement. * j ‘ Segmented worms p. i6 Santa Rosa Junior College Biology 14a. Small multicellular animals with cilia in a ring around the oral end; may have toes that attach them to debris; may move freely. Rotifers p. 17 14b. Not with the above features. 15 15a. Multicellular organisms; may be large or small; has jointed appendages or a segmented body. \l V \ Arthropods’ p.18-24 1- Organisms often flattened bilaterally, r351. lit?) may possess prominent antennae Crustaceans p. 18 2. Four pair of long segmented legs Arachnids p. 19 3. Many segmented organisms, may be womt-like with distinct head end and many legs. Insect larvae p. 20 4. Organisms with six legs and many segments in the abdomen, and two antennae, many with two or three tail-like extensions. " Insect nymphs p. 21—22 5. Organisms in a resting stage, no movement evident, usually with a opaque covering. ' Insect pupae p. 23 . . . is s" 6. Organisms With opaque exoskeleton, Six legs, :.-. may have wings under protective cover, may be found on the surface or swimming under water, many look like beetles. Insect adults p. 24 15b. Other small multicellular animals that do not fit the above conditions; may be colonial or look like a small bear. ' other animals 13. 25 ...
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