Chapter 8_Cross Cultural Studies of Majority_Minority Relations_Fall 2007

Chapter 8_Cross Cultural Studies of Majority_Minority Relations_Fall 2007

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Chapter 8 Cross-Cultural Studies of Majority-Minority Relations Chapter 8: Cross-Cultural Studies of Majority-Minority Relations OBJECTIVES: 1. Understand the cross-cultural evidence on the effects of colonization. 2. Understand why some societies have peaceful intergroup relations. 3. Understand the cross-cultural effects of urbanization and modernization. 4. Distinguish between the cultural and demographic characteristics of majority and minority groups in Brazil and Mexico. 5. Distinguish between overlapping and crosscutting cleavages. Blauner’s theory of internal colonialism A refresher Distinguishes between the nature of the initial contact that different minority groups had with the majority group in the United States o Two distinct groups based on two distinct initial contact situations: (1) Colonized minorities A minority group that was conquered or annexed involuntarily by the majority group in the US (2) Immigrant minorities A minority group that voluntarily entered US society In the US: Racial and ethnic groups who have experienced the greatest disadvantages and have had the greatest conflict with the majority population are those whose initial contact was through COLONIZATION OR CONQUEST. This suggests: o One very important cause of both racial and ethnic stratification and conflict is CONQUEST OR COLONIZATION of one group by another DOES THIS PATTERN HOLD IN OTHER SOCIETIES AROUND THE WORLD? Cross Cultural Evidence on the Effects of Colonization on Majority-Minority Relations Farley examines 6 distinct societies to determine if their patterns of racial and ethnic conflict seem to fit the pattern we have studied within the US: o South Africa o Northern Ireland o Quebec, Canada o The former Soviet Union o The former Yugoslavia o The Middle East 1
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Chapter 8 Cross-Cultural Studies of Majority-Minority Relations Despite wide variation in the specific historical, political, and economic situations of these six societies, one common denominator remains: o In all six instances, the intergroup conflict of the society can be traced back to the colonization of one racial or ethnic group by another. South Africa Original colonization: Roots of the conflict o The Dutch began to colonize in the mid-1600s Originally, the motivation for colonization was for supplying Dutch ships in South African ports However, as time progressed, Dutch settlers began to move inland (known as “trekking”) During this move inland, the Dutch encountered greater numbers of the indigenous South Africans and began o (1) Dutch conquest of indigenous people o (2) Genocide of indigenous people o The British eventually took control of South Africa from the Dutch and made attempts at a more liberal treatment of the indigenous population, but with little success for the following reasons: (1) Those Dutch already in South Africa were pushed even further inland where they continued to conquer and subordinate even more indigenous South Africans
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2008 for the course SOC 1376/1396 taught by Professor Rosenbaum during the Spring '08 term at Montgomery CC.

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Chapter 8_Cross Cultural Studies of Majority_Minority Relations_Fall 2007

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