Ecostudy Pt 2

Ecostudy Pt 2 - Table 3: Concentration of Dissolved Oxygen...

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Table 3: Concentration of Dissolved Oxygen (ppm) Total number of R. sphenocephala observed 0 12 1 43 2 462 3 436 4 116 5 503 6 1 7 26 Graph 4: The total number of tadpoles observed was calculated and to which concentration of dissolved oxygen they were exposed to. Based off of those calculations, table 3, and graph 3 were created. As the dissolved oxygen content within the wetland increases, it seems that the tadpole population also escalates. However, the tadpole population decreases as the oxygen quantity is at six or seven parts per million. Discussion As stated above, the hypothesis for this experiment was that as the concentration of dissolved oxygen decreases, the quantity of Rana sphenocephala tadpoles would also reduce. The two information needed for conducting this experiment were the dissolved oxygen level in the water, and the number of tadpoles observed. By looking at Table 1 and Graph 1, it is clear that the dissolved oxygen concentration continuously fluctuates. For example, from September 6, 2006, to October 11, 2006, the quantity of dissolved oxygen rose from 0 parts per million (ppm) to 5 ppm. Then by October 27 th of the same year, the oxygen concentration declined to 1.3 parts per
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million. Such sharp increases and decreases in oxygen content are able to cause an equally sharp rise or decline in tadpole abundance. However, sometimes the change in oxygen concentration is not as severe. For instance, the concentration of oxygen from April 12, 2007 to May 21, 2007 reduced by a miniscule 1 ppm from 2ppm to 1ppm. Such slight changes in oxygen quantity still have the capability of causing the population to dwindle or proliferate. The concentration of oxygen within the wetland ranges from 0.0 parts per million to 7.0 parts per million showing that the tadpoles ( Rana sphenocephala ) were subjected to various amounts and changes of dissolved oxygen over the course of 11 years. As stated above, the average dissolved oxygen content throughout the entire study is 2.866 ppm. Table 2 shows the quantity of Rana sphenocephala tadpoles from November 1, 2001 to November 8, 2010. On the 189 days the students went to the wetland, a total of 1599 Rana sphenocephala were observed. Their findings are recorded in table 2. Of the 186 days students collected data, they did not find any tadpoles on exactly 50% of those days (93 days). The maximum number of tadpoles caught in one day was 200 whereas the minimum was one. This huge variance of tadpoles observed on one day has many reasons that are explained later in this study. The average number of tadpoles observed throughout the period of this study is around ten tadpoles per day. Using the data from tables one and two, table three and graph four were produced to show the relationship of the abundance of tadpoles when subjected to variant concentrations of dissolved oxygen. Based on this data, it is evident that tadpoles are best suited for waters that have an oxygen concentration of two, three, and five parts per million. Furthermore, when tadpoles are exposed to low concentrations of dissolved
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oxygen (zero and one ppm), the abundance of tadpoles was significantly low. At such
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Ecostudy Pt 2 - Table 3: Concentration of Dissolved Oxygen...

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