Topic #5 - Sensation (General & Audition)

Topic #5 - Sensation (General & Audition) -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
S ENSATION  – P ART  1:  G ENERAL   PRINCIPLES AUDITION Barnett Newman,  Voice of Fire,  1967. (Courtesy National Gallery of Canada,  Ottawa, Canada) PSY1101 B,C,D: Introduction to Experimental Psychology | Dr. K. Campbell
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Sensation   How are sensation and perception different?   Sensation -- sensory input and transmission Transduction (at the level of the receptor). The body’s sensory receptors are  “sensitive” to only a very limited range of the earth’s energy. The receptors  are highly specialized. As an example, the ear is sensitive to energy in the  form of air pressure. The eyes are sensitive to light energy. The role of the  sensory receptor is to transduce a very restricted amount of the earth’s energy  (that required for the survival of the species) into something the nervous  system can understand, an electrical signal. The ear translates one form of  energy (air pressure) into an electrical signal that then travels along the  auditory nerve as an action potential. The eye translates light energy into an  electrical signal that travels along the optic nerve.  Thus, the “message” that  arises in a sensory neuron is always the same: a travelling electrical signal.  However, even though the message along the auditory, visual, somatosensory  and olfactory nerves is the same (an electric signal),  in the end, what we  “experience” in the different modalities and within the same modality is quite  different. When we have the experience of light, we say we “see” it. Similarly,  we do not “hear” light. Philosophers ask very difficult and hard questions, the  sorts of questions that even the wisest neuroscientist cannot answer. What is  doing the seeing? Your eyes? Your visual cortex? Deprived of a visual cortex,  you will be blind; you will not see. We do “see” green and red light. When I  see a green light, do I experience the “green” in the same way as you? How  could a scientist prove that what you experience is identical to what I  experience? What philosophers mean by “experience” is somewhat similar to  what psychologists mean by “perception”. However, even here it is not this  simple. Experience is a “holistic” experience. Thus, a psychologist might  describe the stages of processing that would be required to perceive a rose. A  philosopher would claim that the perception of a rose is not the same as the  experience of it.  o Sensation is objective (more or less. Sensation is probably similar in all  humans and presumably all animals that share one or more of our specific  receptors). o
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/21/2010 for the course PSY 1101 taught by Professor Textbook during the Fall '08 term at University of Ottawa.

Page1 / 15

Topic #5 - Sensation (General & Audition) -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online