m01 - Module 1 Introduction to Internetworking By Dr. Percy...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–14. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Module 1 Introduction to Internetworking By Dr. Percy DIAS © 2009, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Computing Measurement Terms Bits are binary digits. They are either 0s or 1s. In a computer, they are represented by On/Off switches or the presence or absence of electrical charges, light pulses, or radio waves.
Background image of page 2
3 Computing Measurement Terms
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 Base 10 (Decimal) Number System
Background image of page 4
5 Base 10 (Decimal) Calculations Should be familiar because you’ve used it since childhood Example: the number 235 = (2 x 100) + (3 x 10) + (5 x 1) Because you’ve used it so long, you probably don’t think about it
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6 Base 2 (Binary) Numbers
Background image of page 6
7 Base 2 (Binary) Numbers Binary uses just two digits, 0 and 1 Similar to Base 10; differences are in the details Example: the binary number 11101011 is equivalent to the decimal number 235 – Add the decimal value of each bit to get the decimal number (1 * 128) + (1 * 64) + (1 * 32) + (0 * 16) + (1 * 8) + (0 * 4) + (1 * 2) + (1 * 1) = 235 decimal 1
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
8 Four-Octet Dotted-decimal Representation of 32-Bit Binary Numbers Split the binary number into four groups of eight binary digits. Then convert each group of eight bits, also known as an octet into its decimal equivalent.
Background image of page 8
9 Converting IP Addresses Between Decimal and Binary IP addresses are 32-bit binary numbers Humans find it easier to read decimal numbers, so IP addresses are often expressed in dotted-decimal format Each decimal number represents 8 binary digits, also know as an “octet” Each octet can be converted to a decimal number between 0 and 255, inclusive
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
10 Converting Decimal to Binary Start by dividing the decimal by the largest number in the Value row that will go.
Background image of page 10
11 Converting 8-bit Binary Numbers to Decimal Numbers
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
12 Converting 8-Bit Binary to Decimal Binary numbers are converted to decimal numbers by multiplying the binary digits by the base number of the system, which is base 2, and raised to the exponent of its position.
Background image of page 12
13 Hexadecimal The base 16, or hexadecimal (hex), number
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 46

m01 - Module 1 Introduction to Internetworking By Dr. Percy...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 14. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online