m06 - Module 6 IP Address and Routing (The Internetworking...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
© 2009, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Module 6 IP Address and Routing (The Internetworking Layer) By Dr. Percy DIAS
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
© 2009, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Internet Addresses
Background image of page 2
3 © 2009, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. IP Address as a 32-Bit Binary Number Network number identifies the network to which a device is attached (high order or left most bits) Host portion identifies the specific device on that network (lower order or right most bits)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 © 2009, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. IP Addressing Fundamentals Note: The IP protocol has begun what will be a long conversion from IP version 4 to IP version 6. This section focuses on IP version 4 . Basic Facts About IP Addresses - They must be unique inside a particular network - They are 32-bit numbers - They are typically written, entered and displayed as dotted-decimal numbers (e.g., 10.1.5.66) - Each decimal number in a dotted-decimal IP address represents 8 bits of the IP address (often called an octet ) - Each of the four decimal values in an IP address is between 0 and 255, inclusive
Background image of page 4
5 © 2009, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Dual-Homed Computer Device cannot be said to have an address, but each of its connection points (or interfaces) to a network has an address that allows other computers to locate it on that particular network
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6 © 2009, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Network Layer Addressing Network ID enables a router to put a packet onto the appropriate network segment. Host ID helps the router deliver the packet to a specific host.
Background image of page 6
7 © 2009, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. How IP Routing Uses IP Addresses Routers learn routes to directly connected networks easily Routers can forward packets to networks that are not directly connected by sending them to another router, called the next- hop router IP routing relies on organization of IP addresses into groups to allow efficient routing: - IP addresses on the same physical network must have the same value in the first part of the addresses - Routers can scale their routing tables because they need only one entry for each IP network
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
8 © 2009, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Hierarchical IP addresses MAC address: Flat address, locally significant IP address: Globally significant
Background image of page 8
9 © 2009, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Address Class (Classful Addresses) Allocation of addresses is managed by American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN)
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
10 © 2009, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Identifying Address Class
Background image of page 10
11 © 2009, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. IP Address Range
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
© 2009, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Analyzing the Structure of IP Addresses
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 101

m06 - Module 6 IP Address and Routing (The Internetworking...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online