CH2 - Chapter 2 Responsibility in Engineering Columbia...

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Chapter 2 Responsibility in Engineering
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Columbia Disaster On January 16, 2003, at 10:39 a.m. The Columbia lifted off at Kennedy space center. A briefcase-size piece of the brownish-orange insulating foam broke off and hit the edge of the orbiter’s left wing, and left a hole 10 inches across. The information was unknown to Columbia crew and supporting ground staff.
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Columbia Disaster Cameras recorded the impact but the images did not provide sufficient details. Engineer Rodney Rocha and his colleagues requested clearer pictures. Request for the crew to examine the wing. NASA management rejected the request, since foam strikes has never been a safety of flight issue.
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Columbia Disaster Astronauts were told of the problem shortly before reentry. Upon reentry into Earth’s atmosphere, superheated air entered the breach of the wing and began to consume it from inside. Eventually, the bottom surface of the left wing caved upward into the interior of the wing causing Columbia to loose control and disintegrate. THE ENTIRE CREW ALONG WITH THE SPACE CRAFT, WERE LOST .
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ENGINEERING STANDARDS Obligation-Responsibility (Positive): The obligation of professionals to use their specialized knowledge and skill in a way that benefits clients and the public and does not violate the trust placed in them. Blame-Responsibility (Negative): refers to the identification to those to whom blame can be attributed for wrongdoing. Role-Responsibility : refers to a person who occupies a position or role of supervision.
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Obligation-Responsibility and Reasonable care Concept of reasonable care: Engineers have a professional obligation to conform to the standard operating procedures and regulations that apply to the their profession and to fulfill the basic responsibilities of their job as defined by their employment.
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Obligation-Responsibility and reasonable care Kenneth A. Alpern: Principle of care for engineers : “Other things being equal, one should exercise due care to avoid contributing to significantly harming other.” holds with Codes of Engineering Ethics : Engineers shall “hold paramount the safety health and welfare of the public in the performance of their professional duties.” Principle of proportionate care: When one is in a position to contribute to greater harm or when one is in a position to play a more critical part in producing harm than is another person, one must exercise greater care to avoid doing so.”
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Obligation-Responsibility and reasonable care Joshua B. Kodon defines standard of care: Level or quality of service ordinarily provided by other normally competent practitioners of good standing in that field, contemporaneously providing similar services in the same locality and the same circumstances. Also,
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CH2 - Chapter 2 Responsibility in Engineering Columbia...

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