Microsoft_PowerPoint_-_Chapter7_Risk_and_Liability_in_engineering_Compatibility_Mode_

Microsoft_PowerPoint_-_Chapter7_Risk_and_Liability_in_engineering_Compatibility_Mode_

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Chapter 7 Risk and Liability in Engineering
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Case n On September 11, 2001, terrorists attacked the Twin Towers by flying two hijacked 727 passenger jets into the twin towers. n The first consequence of the attack was the fire that started over several floors by high-octane aviation fuel. n In the hour following the plane crashes, the intense heat of the flames (more than 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit) caused the steel floor beams in each tower to sag. n As a result , the floor structures broke away from the external vertical load-carrying beams.
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Introduction n How should engineers deal with issues of safety and risk, especially when they involve possible liability for harm? In the Twin Towers case, the risk was increased by the earlier weakening of building codes and the use of new structural designs that were untested, even though the building codes required such testing. n Engineering involves risk. The element of risk is greatly increased because engineers are constantly involved in innovation.
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Codes of Ethics: Engineering Practice Regarding Safety and Risk n The NSPE code of Ethics, in Sections II.1.b and III.2.b, requires engineers to design safely, defining this in terms of “accepted engineering standards”. For example, item III,2,b instructs engineers not to “complete sign or seal plans and/or specifications that are not of a design safe to the public health and welfare and in conformity with accepted engineering standards” standards”. n Item II.1.a instructs engineers that if their professional judgment is overruled in “circumstances where the safety, health, property or welfare of the public are endangered,” then they are obligated to “notify their employer or client and such other authority as may be appropriate.”
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Safety, Risk, and Local building Codes n One of the more important ways professional engineers show a concern for the general public (and their safety) is in carrying out the local building code requirements in designing such things as buildings, elevators, escalators, bridges, walk-ways, roads, and overpasses. n When a responsible engineer recognizes a violation of a building code in a design and does not object to it, the engineer bears some responsibility for any injuries or deaths that result. Similarly, when an engineer learns of a proposed change in a building code that she is convinced creates danger for the public and does nothing to prevent that change, the engineer bears some responsibility for any harm done.
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Safety, Risk, and Local Building Codes n The twin Towers case illustrates these issues. New York City building codes in place in 1945 required that all stairwells be surrounded with heavy masonry and concrete structure. n
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This note was uploaded on 12/23/2010 for the course ENMG 504 taught by Professor Halazoghbi during the Spring '09 term at American University of Beirut.

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Microsoft_PowerPoint_-_Chapter7_Risk_and_Liability_in_engineering_Compatibility_Mode_

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