Microsoft_PowerPoint_-_chapter10_International_Engineering_Professionalism_Compatibility_Mode_

Microsoft_PowerPoint_-_chapter10_International_Engineering_Professionalism_Compatibility_Mode_

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 10 International Engineering Professionalism Introduction n Clothing industry is the first level of industrialization in most countries. Factories employ young women in sweat shop conditions. They also hire children. n David Lindauer, Wellesley economist and world Bank consultant, remarks: “We know of no case where a nation developed a modern “We know of no case where a nation developed a modern manufacturing sector without first going through a “sweatshop” phase. How long ago was it that children could be found working in the textile factories of Lowell Massachusetts; or Manchester, England: or of Osaka Japan? n Also, a workers rights advocate in Bangladesh remarks that throwing children out of work on the street would be a serious violation of their human rights. Introduction n Harwell & James is a small clothing manufacturing company. It owns and operates a plant in Country X. Young women live in company dormitories and work for 0.80$ per day which is the low end of the price spectrum. They work 12-hour days in a clean, safe, and well-lit factory and work as hard but say they still prefer it to village life where jobs, might well be forced into begging or prostitution and there are no serious health or safety problems at the prostitution and there are no serious health or safety problems at the plant. n A manager for H&J responds that if his firm left Country X another company will take its place. “ the message from business”, he maintains, “is to follow the dollar and learn to effect changes from within”. n Hanna is an Engineer who has been asked to go spend a year in country X to design and supervise new equipments for Harwell $ James. Nevertheless, some of Hanna's engineering colleagues argue that she should not take the assignment because it makes her a party to the exploitation of the young women. Introduction n Many engineers work overseas. They will encounter crossing of national and cultural boundaries which is occurring through out the world that can produce ethical dilemmas. Definitions: - Home country : engineer’s country of origin - Host country : engineer’s other than country of origin.- Lesser industrialized countries (LICs) : countries which are not fully industrialized.- Boundary crossing problems : Extreme situations 1. Absolutist solution: Rules, laws, customs and values of ones home country should follow.. 2. Relativist solution : Engineers should not assume that the values in ones culture should always guide their actions When in Rome do what the Romans do. (Local Customs) The search for standards to determine when a solution for a boundary-crossing problem is or is not acceptable. n Cultural-Transcending norms (CT norms) : norms that are more directed to the kinds of issues that arise in international ethics and less culture-dependent than the ethical issues of either the home or host country....
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Microsoft_PowerPoint_-_chapter10_International_Engineering_Professionalism_Compatibility_Mode_

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