L6 Life Cycles

L6 Life Cycles - 1. TheFloweringPlants:Chap.23 2.

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Review of Lecture 5 1. The Flowering Plants: Chap. 23 2. The Innovations: Divide and Conquer and  Leveraging your resources 3. The benefits: Domination 4. Evolution of Flowers 5. Evolution of Flowering Plants 6. Sampling diversity
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Evolution of Flowering Plants 1. Angiosperms appear in fossil record 130-145 mya  (earliest seed plants 365 mya) 2. RNA and DNA sequence data suggest that the lineage  may have been separate from other seed plants for 280  my  3. Spread quickly: selective advantages 4. Flowers co-evolved with insect and animal pollinators 5. Cross-pollination enhanced  6. Widely separated plant populations can exchange and  recombine their genes
Background image of page 2
sporangia Chap.23 pg. 489 Fern Frond
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Possible Evolutionary Relationships of Major Angiosperm Groups Chap. 23, pg.491
Background image of page 4
Darwin’s “abominable mystery” 1. Angiosperms did not appear in large numbers in fossil  record until about 100 mya 2. Origin and spread of Angiosperms was rather sudden in  evolutionary terms 3. Not clear why  1. Configuration of continents? 2. Changes in climate? 3. Better adapted than gymnosperms? EARTH
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The challenges 1. Harvesting light energy 2. Staying wet when things get dry 3. Dealing with gravity 4. Divide or be conquered  5. Leveraging resources
Background image of page 6
Lecture 6 Outline 1. Life Cycles and Reproductive Structures:  Chap. 6,22,23 2. The benefits: Maximizing your potential 3. Modes of Reproduction 4. The gamete paradox 5. Gymnosperm reproduction 6. Angiosperm reproduction
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Plant Life Cycles and Reproductive Structures 1. Reproduction can occur asexually or sexually 2. Asexual reproduction occurs through mitosis  (vegetative fragmentation, spore formation):  offspring are genetically identical 3. Sexual reproduction results in genetic variation  (fusion of gametes)
Background image of page 8
Plant Life Cycles: Asexual Reproduction 1. Asexual or vegetative reproduction involves cell  divisions by mitosis such that offspring are genetic  clones ’ of parent 2. In a stable environm ent, a plant that  reproduces vegetatively will quickly  propagate itself (selective advantage)
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Asexual Reproduction Chap.6, pg.125 Water hyacinth Piggyback plant Kalanchoe adventitious plantlets Cholla cacti Quaking aspen
Background image of page 10
Plant Life Cycles: Sexual Reproduction 1. Sexual reproduction leads to offspring that are genetically  different from the parents and each other
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/23/2010 for the course BIOL 120 taught by Professor Chuong during the Spring '09 term at Waterloo.

Page1 / 43

L6 Life Cycles - 1. TheFloweringPlants:Chap.23 2.

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online