L7 Roots - Review of Lecture 6 1....

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Review of Lecture 6 1. Life Cycles and Reproductive Structures:  Chap. 6,22,23 2. The benefits: Maximizing your potential 3. Modes of Reproduction 4. The gamete paradox 5. Gymnosperm reproduction 6. Angiosperm reproduction
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Plant Life Cycles and Reproductive Structures 1. Reproduction can occur asexually or sexually 2. Asexual reproduction occurs through mitosis  (vegetative fragmentation, spore formation):  offspring are genetically identical 3. Sexual reproduction results in genetic variation  (fusion of gametes)
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Gymnosperm Reproduction Chap.6, pg. 131
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Angiosperm Reproduction Chap.6, pg. 132
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Gymnosperms 1. Male gametophyte has 6 cells at maturity 2. Megasporocyte does not  undergo meiosis or complete  development until pollination 3. Female gametophyte (megagametophyte) produces  archegonia 4. Only one  sperm fertilizes the egg (the other sperm  degenerates) 5. Megagametophyte tissue (1n) provides nutrition for the  embryo
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Angiosperms 1. Male gametophyte has 2-3 cells at maturity 2. Megasporocyte undergoes meiosis independent  of  pollination 3. Female gametophyte (megagametophyte) consists of 8  nuclei and 7 cells 1. Double fertilization : one sperm fertilizes egg and one  sperm fertilizes the central cell (polar nuclei) 1. Endosperm (3n) provides nutrition for the embryo
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Angiosperms: Co-evolution 1. Flowering plants rely on pollinators to spread  their genes around 2. Pollinators rely on plants for food 3. Natural selection strengthened their mutually  beneficial relationship as the reproductive success  of both was dependent on their interactions 4. Disadvantage: specialization comes with risks…
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The challenges 1. Harvesting light energy 2. Staying wet when things get dry 3. Dealing with gravity 4. Divide or be conquered  5. Leveraging resources
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Lecture 7 Outline 1. Plant Root Systems: Chapter 4 2. Functions of the root 3. Different root systems 4. Root Structure, Anatomy and Growth 5. Root Tissues 6. Specialized Functions 7. Mutualism
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Plant Root Systems 1. Key functions: Anchor plant, absorption of  water and minerals 2. Additional functions: produce hormones,  regulate plant development, propagation, storage 1. Two main types  of root systems: taproot and  fibrous root systems
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Taproot system Typical of Dicots and  Gymnosperms (develops directly from  embryonic root) Chap.4, pg.72 Lateral root
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This note was uploaded on 12/23/2010 for the course BIOL 120 taught by Professor Chuong during the Spring '09 term at Waterloo.

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L7 Roots - Review of Lecture 6 1....

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