L8 Stems and Leaves

L8 Stems and Leaves - ReviewofLecture7 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Review of Lecture 7 1. Plant Root Systems: Chapter 4 2. Functions of the root 3. Different root systems 4. Root Structure, Anatomy and Growth 5. Root Tissues 6. Specialized Functions 7. Mutualism
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Taproot Systems 1. Taproots penetrate deeply although conifers  roots generally do not 2. Small plants can have significant taproot  systems 3. Taproots can enhance survival in harsh  environments (drought tolerance)
Background image of page 2
Fibrous Root Systems 1. Each adventitious root forms lateral roots 2. Root system is typically shallower 3. Better at water acquisition 4. Often found in annuals (plants that have only a  one year growing season)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Root Anatomy and Growth Chap.4 pg.74
Background image of page 4
Seed plants have two important cell layers  surrounding the stele pericycle and endodermis Dicot Monocot
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Casparian Strip 1. Composed of  suberin  and  som etim es  lignin 2. The outside and inside facing  endoderm al cell walls lack   this strip 3. Water, m inerals and organic  m olecules therefore m ust be  transported through the cell  proper (bio-filter or  gatekeeper!)
Background image of page 6
Specialized Functions Serving other needs (Lab #4) 1. Access to air or water in the air 2. Additional Support 3. Asexual reproduction 4. Water storage 5. Food storage 6. Parasitism
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Forming Relationships  Mutualism 1. Mutually beneficial associations with other organism s 2. Mycorrhizae (from  Greek, mykes, “fungus” and rhiza “root”)  beneficial associations between roots and soil fungi 3. Common to more than 80% of plant species 4. Evidence of fungal associations in fossil record.  These  associations were probably important in facilitating colonization  of land 5. Two types:  endomycorrhizae  and  ectomycorrhizae
Background image of page 8
The challenges 1. Harvesting light energy 2. Staying wet when things get dry 3. Dealing with gravity 4. Divide or be conquered  5. Leveraging resources
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Lecture 8 Outline 1. Stems and Leaves: Chapter 4 2. Stem structure and functions 3. Specialized stem functions 4. Phyllotaxy 5. Leaf Venation 6. Specialized leaf functions
Background image of page 10
A stem and its leaves are commonly known as a  shoot 1. Stems move leaves toward light and away from  shade 2. Stems support the weight of leaves
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/23/2010 for the course BIOL 120 taught by Professor Chuong during the Spring '09 term at Waterloo.

Page1 / 44

L8 Stems and Leaves - ReviewofLecture7 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online