WAN Paper - NETWORK DESIGN, COMPUTER INC. 1 WIDE AREA...

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NETWORK DESIGN, COMPUTER INC. 1 WIDE AREA NETWORK (WAN) Paper Axia College of University of Pheonix IT/230 9/11/2010
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NETWORK DESIGN, COMPUTER INC. 2 Introduction A Wide Area Network (WAN) is a communication network made up of computers that are not locally connected to one another, exchanging data across a wide area or great distance. The most common example is the Internet, though a Wide Area Network does not need to be global to qualify as a wide area network. Some examples of smaller networks in a Wide Area Network include Municipal Area Networks (MANs), Campus Area Networks (CANs) and Local Area Networks (LANs). A Local Area Network can become a Wide Area Network if a company with headquarters over a great distance links their two Local Area Networks together over the Internet. Regardless of the distance, they would still be able to freely exchange data as if they were physically connected to one network. Connection Types Dial Up - Dial-up Internet access is a type of Internet connectivity that operates through a standard telephone line. Dial-up service is the least expensive but also the slowest type of Internet access. Due to the limited bandwidth, dial-up service can take up to five minutes to download just one megabyte of data. Caching frequently visited pages, and other software tricks and tweaks can speed up the experience of dial-up access in some cases. However, if your main purpose online is networking, dial-up service may be so slow as to be unsatisfactory.
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NETWORK DESIGN, COMPUTER INC. 3 DSL - Digital Subscriber Line is a high-speed Internet access service that utilizes existing copper telephones lines to send and receive data at speeds that far exceed conventional dial-up modems. The fastest dial-up modems are rated at 57 kilobits per second and usually operate at about 53 Kbps under good conditions. By comparison, DSL allows datastream speeds from 1.5 to 8 megabits per second, depending on the grade of DSL service purchased. DSL uses standard telephone lines to transmit upstream and downstream data on a digital frequency, which sets these datastreams apart from the analog signals telephones and fax machines use. Because the DSL signal is operating on a different frequency, the telephone can be used normally, even when connected to the Internet. The only requirement when applying DSL to any network is an Internet service provider, a DSL broadband modem, and a DSL filter to eliminate interference over the line. Cable – High-speed cable Internet service refers to the delivery of Internet service over a cable network. A cable network uses coaxial or fiber optic cabling to deliver data over the network. One drawback of a cable Internet service is that the speed is affected by how many people in the immediate area are using the Internet service at once. Many people using the service simultaneously can saturate bandwidth resources, thereby slowing the
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NETWORK DESIGN, COMPUTER INC. 4 connection to the cable modem. DSL is unaffected by this, as the subscriber uses his or
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WAN Paper - NETWORK DESIGN, COMPUTER INC. 1 WIDE AREA...

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