MLA format - Angeli 1 Elizabeth L. Angeli Professor...

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Unformatted text preview: Angeli 1 Elizabeth L. Angeli Professor Patricia Sullivan English 624 14 December 2008 Toward a Recovery of Nineteenth Century Farming Handbooks While researching texts written about nineteenth century farming, I found a few authors who published books about the literature of nineteenth century farming, particularly agricultural journals, newspapers, pamphlets, and brochures. These authors often placed the farming literature they were studying into an historical context by discussing the important events in agriculture of the year in which the literature was published (see Demaree, for example). However, while these authors discuss journals, newspapers, pamphlets, and brochures, I could not find much discussion about another important source of farming knowledge: farming handbooks. My goal in this paper is to bring this source into the agricultural literature discussion by connecting three agricultural handbooks from the nineteenth century with nineteenth century agricultural history. To achieve this goal, I have organized my paper into four main sections, two of which have sub-sections. In the first section, I provide an account of three important events in nineteenth century agricultural history: population and technological changes, the distribution of scientific new knowledge, and farmings influence on education. In the second section, I discuss three nineteenth century farming handbooks in connection with the important events described in the first section. I end my paper with a third section that offers research questions that could be answered in future versions of this paper and Page numbers begin on and with page 1. Type your name next to the page number so that it appears on every page. Your name, the course number, the professors name, and the date of the paper are double- spaced in 12-point, Times New Roman font. Dates in MLA are written in this order: day, month, and year. Titles are centered and written in 12-point, Times New Roman font. The title is not bolded, underlined, or italicized. Blue boxes contain directions for writing and citing in MLA style. Green text boxes contain explanations of MLA style guidelines. The introduc- tory paragraph, or introduc- tion, should set the context for the rest of the paper. Tell your readers why you are writing and why your topic is important. The thesis is a clear position that you will support and develop throughout your paper. This sentence guides or controls your paper. If your paper is long, you may want to write about how your paper is organized. This will help your readers follow your ideas. The thesis statement usually is the last sentence of the introduc- tion. MLA requires double-spacing throughout the document; do not single-space any part of the document. Angeli 2 conclude with a fourth section that discusses the importance of expanding this particular project. I also include an appendix after the Works Cited that contains images of the three handbooks I examined. Before I can begin the examination of the three handbooks, handbooks I examined....
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This note was uploaded on 01/03/2011 for the course ENGR 482 taught by Professor Russell during the Fall '08 term at Texas A&M.

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MLA format - Angeli 1 Elizabeth L. Angeli Professor...

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