Sustainability%20for%20Ethics%20Class%202final0(2)

Sustainability%20for%20Ethics%20Class%202final0(2) - Robin...

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Unformatted text preview: Robin Autenrieth, Ph.D., P.E. Department of Civil Engineering Texas A&M University More Students Adding Environmental, Sustainability Elements To Studies.  Crain's Detroit Business (11/22, Benedetti) reported, "More undergraduate and graduate students are adding an environmental or sustainability element to their educational plans -- or honing in on it as a major." At the University of Michigan, for example, "undergraduate enrollment in [its] Program in the Environment initiative has more than doubled since 2005. . .. And its School of Natural Resources and Environment has seen an 83 percent jump in its master's program enrollment." According to the university, "dual degrees in engineering, law and business fuel the growth." Carol Miller, chairwoman of Wayne State University's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, reported similar interest. "Typically, these students are practicing engineers who want to supplement their existing knowledge and be more marketable but aren't willing to commit to the demands of a graduate degree," she explained. Miller detailed some of WSU's programs, including "sustainability components in both undergraduate and graduate degree programs in civil and environmental engineering." Sustainability as a professional ethic?  What does that mean? o How would adopting a sustainability ethic alter the way we practice engineering today? o Is it even possible? o Can it be profitable? Some interesting websites:  Fords Rouge Plant http://www.thehenryford.org/rouge/reinventin o Green Business http://www.greenbiz.com/ o Floating Plastic Islands http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uLrVCI4N6 o Ecological Footprint http://www.myfootprint.org/ Consider engineering practices historically Roman bridge in Merida, Spain Pyramids in Egypt Great Wall of China More contemporary engineering U.S. Strip mall FAST, POWERFUL GAS GUZZLERS Cell phones e-Waste - 70% of the overall toxic waste currently found in landfills  Televisions Before plasma screen and liquid crystal display (LCD), TVs consisted of cathode ray tubes (CRT) Approximately 20 %of CRTs are comprised of lead, equivalent to between 4 and 8 pounds per unit. As of Feb. 19, 2009, the FCC requires that all televisions must run a digital resulting in many consumers disposing of their old TVs Cell phones  Cell phones do not contain as much toxic material as larger electronic devices, but the shelf life is about 18 months for the average consumer. It is estimated that there are more than 500 million used cell phones ready for disposal. o Cell phone coatings are often made of Pb. If these 500 million cell phones are disposed of in landfills, it will result in 312,000 pounds of Pb released....
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This note was uploaded on 01/03/2011 for the course ENGR 482 taught by Professor Russell during the Fall '08 term at Texas A&M.

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Sustainability%20for%20Ethics%20Class%202final0(2) - Robin...

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