APUSH Chapter 7 IDs - Chapter 7 IDs Newburgh Conspiracy a...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 7 IDs Newburgh Conspiracy - a scheme by Robert Morris and numerous officers who were afraid that they would never receive their pensions to line up the army and public creditors with nationalists in congress, and confront the states with the threat of a coup d’etat unless they yielded more power to Congress. This was a perfect demonstration of the weakness of the Confederate Congress, as they utterly lacked the power to raise enough revenue to pay the soldiers Land Ordinance of 1785 - The Ordinance that outlined a plan to divide western lands into rectangular grids of 6x6 miles, which were further divided into 36 one-square-mile plots sold at $1 per acre. Notably, the 16 th section was reserved for support for schools, a significant departure from the time when schools were rare Northwest Ordinance of 1787 - Declared that territories needed a period of “tutelage” before they could become states, requiring each territory to function under a governor, three judges, and a secretary until its population reached 60,000. Notably, it completely forbade slavery in the Northwest, and provided each state with a Bill of Rights guaranteeing legislative representation, religious freedom, trial by jury, and habeus corpus. Shay’s Rebellion - Shay’s Rebellion occurred in 1787 when 1200 farmers led by Daniel Shays marched on a federal arsenal in Springfield. Notably, because Congress could not force states to provide soldiers, the Massachusetts Militia had to make several attempts before overcoming the farmers. This essentially highlighted the weaknesses of the Confederation Congress, and prompted leaders to form the Constitutional Convention Annapolis Convention
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern