{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Lec31_handout - BioG1780 Evolution and Biodiversity...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
BioG1780 Fall 2010 Evolution and Biodiversity Today’s lecturer: Harry Greene Lectures 31: November 12, 2010 1. Animals—Out of the soup: body plans and the hole that matters. With this and remaining biodiversity lectures we explore the remarkable adaptive radiation of animals, as well as certain other closely related and fascinating eukaryotes. In terms this lecture, first review pp. 583-585 in Ch. 27 of Sadava et al. regarding basal lineages of Unikonts, then read Ch. 31 on the rise of animals. 2. What are Unikonts, Opisthoconts, and Animals? As is the case for Plantae, the lineages basal to fungi and animals are relatively simple and retain shared primitive features (NB: what is the technical general term for such attributes?) with more basal eukaryotes. Uniconts have a single flagellum and consist of opithoconts (fungi, choanoflagellates, and animals) and amoebozoans (the loboseans or amoebae and the slime molds). Relatively basal fungi (like chytrids), choanoflagellates, sponges, and amoebozoans are all unicellular or relatively simple multicellular organisms, and thus also like most other relatively basal eukaryotes. Indeed, we can now look back at the basic eukaryote TOL and observed repeated, independent “descent with modification” resulting in increasing complexity (e.g., in
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}