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Evaluation of some hybrid rice varieties in under different sowing times

Evaluation of some hybrid rice varieties in under different sowing times

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African Journal of Plant Science Vol. 3 (4), pp. 053-058, April 2009 Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJPS ISSN 1996-0824 © 2009 Academic Journals Full Length Research Paper Evaluation of some hybrid rice varieties in under different sowing times Ali Abdalla Basyouni Abou-Khalif Rice research and training center, filed crops, research institute, ARC, Egypt. E-mail: [email protected] Accepted 26 of March, 2009 A field experiment was conducted in the experimental farm of Rice Research and Training Center (RRTC) – Sakha, Kafr- El Sheikh Governorate, and Egypt during rice season in 2008 for physiological evaluation of some hybrid rice varieties in different sowing dates. Four hybrid rice H1, H2, GZ 6522 and GZ 6903 were used. Seeds were sown on six different sowing dates April 10 th , April 20 th , May 1 st , May 10 th , May 20 th and June 1 st ; and seedlings of 26 days old were transplanted at 20 × 20 cm spacing. All agricultural practices recommended for each cultivar were applied. Nitrogen fertilizer was used as urea (46.5% N) in two splits; that is, 2/3 were added and mixed in dry soil before flooding of irrigation water and the other 1/3 was added at panicle initiation stage. Experimental design was spilt plot design, with sowing dates as main and varieties as sub plot treatments. Results indicated that early date of sowing (April 20 th ) was superior to other dates of sowing for MT, PI, HD, number of tillers /M 2, (plant height and root length) at PI and HD stage, chlorophyll content, number of days up to PI and HD, leaf area index, sink capacity , spikelets-leaf area ratio, number of grains / panicle, panicle length(cm), 1000-grain weight (g), number of panicles/ M 2 , panicle weight (g) and grain yield (ton/ha). Sterility percentage was the lowest in sowing 20 th April. 1 st of June, sowing gave the lowest with all traits under study. H1 hybrid rice variety surpassed other varieties for all characters studied except for number of days to PI and HD. Key words: Sowing dates, hybrid rice, physiological characters and yield. INTRODUCTION The variation in rice production could be attributable to different climates when other conditions are suitable. The optimal growing season of popular cultivars has been determined by testing their growth and yields at different sowing dates. Singh and Parsed (1999), Hari et al. (1999), and Pirdashfy et al. (2000). Found that delayed sowing decreased the grain and, straw yield, harvest index, tiller number, panicle length, number of grain/pani- cle and fertility percentage. Sherief et al. (2000) studied the effect of sowing dates (April 25 th May 10 th , May 25 th and June 10 th ) on yield and yield components of rice. They showed marked effect on number of panicles /m 2 , number of filled grains / panicle, 1000-grain weight, grain and straw yields/fed by early sowing (May 10). As com- pared to the planting in April 25 th , however, late planting in May 25 th or June 10 significantly reduced the above characteristics mentioned. El-Hity et al. (1987) found that the number of days from sowing to panicle initiation (P.I), maximum tillering (M.T.), heading dates (H.D.) and grain
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