Lect1 Intro&Functional Anatomy

Lect1 Intro&Functional Anatomy - General Microbiology...

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1 General Microbiology Lecture 1: Course Overview Fall 2010 Dr. Pedro Gutierrez
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Course Overview 2
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3 Background Microbes and us How they harm us How they benefit us The Microbial World
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4 Microbes… Are organisms too small to see with your eyes (usually) Functions Maintain ecological balance Needed to maintain good health Produce useful byproducts Can cause disease
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5 The first evidence of their existence 1673-1723, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek is the first to see “animalcules”
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Spontaneous Generation The hypothesis that living organisms arise from nonliving matter is called spontaneous generation. According to spontaneous generation, a “vital force” forms life. The alternative hypothesis, that the living organisms arise from preexisting life, is called biogenesis.
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Jan Baptista van Helmont’s recipe Place a dirty shirt or some rags in an open pot or barrel containing a few grains of wheat or some wheat bran, and in 21 days, mice will appear. There will be adult males and females present, and they will be capable of mating and reproducing more mice.
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Spontaneous Generation vs. Francesco Redi Difficult to disprove 1600’s – Francesco Redi
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Spontaneous generation and microbes 1745: John Needham put boiled nutrient broth into covered flasks. Nutrient broth heated, then placed in sealed flask Result: Microbial growth
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Lazzaro Spallanzani’s Experiments Sealed nutrient solutions in flasks, then boiled. Different boiling times required to kill different organisms Microorganisms in the air can contaminate experiments Spontaneous generation of microorganisms does not occur BUT, Maybe air provides the vital force!
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Louis Pasteur The father of microbiology
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Louis Pasteur’s Experiments 1861 – Demonstrated that air contains microorganisms by filtering air through a cotton plug
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The nail in the coffin
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Microbes are… Prokaryotes Archaea Bacteria Non-living Viruses Prions Eukaryotes Algae Protozoa Fungi Heminths 14
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Characteristics of Prokaryotes 15 “pre-nucleus” Domains: Archaea and Bacteria Unicellular; divide by binary fission Cells may be surrounded by cell wall No membrane-bound nucleus or organelles Prokaryotic microbes: Archaea and Bacteria
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16 Prokaryotes Bacteria Single-celled Specific shapes Rigid cell walls composed of peptidoglycan Multiply by binary fission Can move using appendages Archaea Same appearance as bacteria Cell walls not composed of peptidoglycan Grow in extreme environments Bacteriology
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17 Archaea - Extreme Environment! Prokaryotes Prokaryotes
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18 Characteristics of Eukaryotes “true nucleus” Domain: Eukarya Single-celled or multicellular +/- cell walls Membrane-bound nucleus and organelles Eukrayotic microbes: Helminths, algae, fungi and protozoa
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19 Eukaryotes Algae Single-celled or multicellular All contain chlorophyll Rigid cell walls made of cellulose May use flagella for movement Algae Parasitology
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This note was uploaded on 12/29/2010 for the course BIOL 210 taught by Professor Gutiérrez during the Spring '10 term at Coastline Community College.

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Lect1 Intro&Functional Anatomy - General Microbiology...

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