Lect11 Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning

Lect11 Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning - ParalyticShellfish...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Paralytic Shellfish  Poisoning
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Paralytic shellfish poisoning is a food borne illness caused by consumption of shellfish that contain concentrated neurotoxins. Shellfish filter toxic algae from the water, and the toxins accumulate in their tissues, frequently without great effect on shellfish health. Saxitoxins are potent neurotoxins that act to block movement of sodium through nerve cell membranes, stopping the flow of nerve impulses causing the symptoms of PSP.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
Ingestion of raw or cooked mollusks that contain the toxin in sufficient quantities. Shellfish commonly responsible for PSP include: Oysters Clams Mussels Scallops
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
the soft, green substance found in the body cavity of the lobster that functions as the liver and pancreas contain PSP toxin
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Symptoms of PSP usually develop fairly rapidly, within 30min to 2 hours after ingestion of contaminated shellfish, depending on the amount of toxin consumed.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Currently no diagnostic test is available Supportive and Symptom-driven Activated charcoal Aggressive airway management
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/29/2010 for the course BIOL 210 taught by Professor Gutiérrez during the Spring '10 term at Coastline Community College.

Page1 / 25

Lect11 Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning - ParalyticShellfish...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online