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Fishing_Aquaculture

Fishing_Aquaculture - Fishing Aquaculture Importance of...

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Fishing & Aquaculture
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Importance of Aquatic Biodiversity Our planet is 75% water yet we’ve only explored about 5% of the global ocean. Biodiversity is highest in coral reefs, estuaries, and deep-ocean floor Marine ecosystems provide ecological and economic services valued at about $21 trillion per year – twice that of terrestrial ecosystems
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Aquatic Biodiversity More than half of the world’s population (~3.5 billion) rely on the ocean for their primary source of food About 75% of the world’s commercially valuable marine fish species are fished at or beyond sustainable limits (the O of HIPPO) 90% of large open-ocean fish (tuna, swordfish) have disapeared since 1950
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Fishing Techniques Drift net – 1992 U.N. voluntary ban on drift nets longer than 1.5 miles long line fishing - swordfish, tuna, sharks - Endangers sea turtles, pilot whales, and dolphins bottom trawling – shrimp, cod, flounder, scallops – like clear-cutting forests – species not wanted called bycatch purse seine – tuna, mackerel, anchovies, herring – use aircraft to spot schools of fish
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Fig. 12-A, p. 255
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