ksp - Cut to the Chase Ksp Dissolving Participates When...

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Cut to the Chase: Ksp Dissolving Participates When deciding if a solvent will make a precipitate dissolve, you should use LeChatelier’s Principle to answer the question. One of two situations will exist. Either the solvent will have a common ion with the precipitate ( makes it a very easy problem), or the solvent has no common ion with the precipitate ( a more difficult problem). Consider the dissolving of Mg(OH) 2 in various solvents: Mg(OH) 2 (s)  Mg 2+ + 2 OH - ( Always start by writing the equation for the salt dissolving) Example 1 : When the solvent contains a common ion with the precipitate that is being dissolved. Is Mg(OH) 2 more or less soluble in a NaOH solution? ( OH - is the common ion) Start by writing the equation for the salt dissolving: (Mg(OH) 2 Mg 2+ + 2OH - ) Since NaOH is a strong electrolyte, it will form Na + ions and OH - ions. This is the easiest type of problem. Since NaOH has a common ion, (OH - ), with the dissociation reaction for Mg(OH) 2 , then by adding OH
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ksp - Cut to the Chase Ksp Dissolving Participates When...

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