Chapter 10 PM-1 - Geology 3443 Spring 2006 Chapter 10 Folds...

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Geology 3443 Spring 2006 Chapter 10 Folds Anatomy of a Folded Surface 1. Be able to give definitions of the terms in Table 10. Amplitude- half the height of the structure measured from crest to trough Arc length- distance between two hinges of the same orientation measured over the folded surface Axial surface- surface containing the hinge lines from consecutive folded surfaces Crest- topographically the highest point of a fold Cross section- vertical plane through a fold Culmination- high point of the hinge line in a noncylindrical fold Cylindrical fold- fold in which a straight line parallels the fold axis, fold wraps around a cylinder Depression- low point of the hinge line in a noncylindrical fold Fold axis- fold generator in cylindrical fold Hinge- region of greatest curvature in a fold Hinge line- line of greatest curvature Inflection point- position on a limb where the sense of curvature changes Limb- Less curved portion of a fold Noncyldrical fold- folds with a curved hinge line Profile plane- surface perpendicular to hinge line Trough- Topographically lowest point of a fold Wavelength- distance between two hinges of the same orientation 2. What are the differences between the following terms: Anticline -a fold with older rocks in the concave part of the structure Syncline - a fold with younger rocks in the concave part of the structure Antiform/synform –Are anticline and synclines where the ages of the rocks are not known Upright fold- axial surface is almost vertical Inclined fold- axial surface that dip significantly, one limb may be upside down Recumbent fold- axial surface of nearly horizontal, one limb is upside down Fold Classification 3. What are the 4 components of fold classification?
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