{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

_Homework_homework1

_Homework_homework1 - Read this paper note that UCD...

Info icon This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Homework 1. Due Monday, 10 April. 1. Complete the on-line web-based training course on the rights and welfare of human participation. You will be able to print out a certificate of completion upon completing the course. Turn in the certificate. You will then be able to work on projects involving human subjects (clinical trials or other NIH funded studies.) The web site can be found at http://cme.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/learning/humanparticipant-protections.asp 2. A recent study reported in in J. Amer. Med Assoc found that successful treatment of depression in mothers resulted in better psychological outcomes for their children (Weissman et al., Remissions in maternal depression and child psychopathology: a STAR*D-child report.JAMA. 2006 Mar 22;295(12):1389-98.)
Image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Read this paper; note that UCD subscribes to JAMA so you can read it online from a UCD account. The url is: http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/295/12/1389 3. Then write a brief summary (no more than one page, maybe just half a page) of a potential ethical issue in this study and how it was addressed. You should note: a. What is the ethical issue? b. How might this violate the basic principles of ethics in medical research? c. How have the investigators attempted to address this? 4. Piantadosi (Table 7.3) lists seven types of clinical bias. Which, if any, of these do you think might be present in this study, and why? Note that we are skipping around a bit in the book. Piantadosi covers ethics in Chapter 2 and bias in Chapter 7. 1...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern