pom212_passion_fruit_2005_handout

pom212_passion_fruit_2005_handout - Passion Fruit...

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Unformatted text preview: Passion Fruit Passiflora edulis Passion Fruit • Berry with seeds within a juicy aril • 400 species – Only small number are palatable • Native to Brazil – Australia, New Zealand, South Africa • Passiflora edulis – purple form • Introduced yellow form to Hawaii – Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa – More acidic, more juicy – Used for processing • Acidity – 2.4 to 5% • Strong aroma 1 Harvest • Fully ripe – Increase in aroma and juice content with greater maturity – Increase in SS, decrease in TA Postharvest • Climacteric fruit with very high ethylene production, but quality optimum at harvest • Store in cool, well-ventilated area well– Recommend 5 to 9C (4 to 5 weeks) – < 6.5C chilling injury – > 6.5C decay • For processing, fruit fall to ground in vineyard – Come through at least once a week • Rake up or mechanical harvest • Lose weight very quickly after harvest – Polyethylene bags at low temperatures (42 d at 6C) • Processing quality – – – Characteristic flavor High juice content (25 to 40%) High acidity preferred – add sugar Pests • Pathogens – Anthracnose on skin and pulp – Phytopthora fruit rot – Alternaria – brown spots Passion fruit Holding time Temperature (°C) 50 RF heating 40 Drain hot water and add 20°C water • Quarantine – Fruit flies 30 Air dried at 10°C 20 0 2 4 6 8 10 Minutes 2 3 4 Passion Fruit 5 ...
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This note was uploaded on 12/30/2010 for the course POM 212 taught by Professor Kadermitcham during the Spring '05 term at UC Davis.

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