MUSIC100 Chapter 2 - MUSIC100 Chapter 2 THE ELEMENTS OF...

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MUSIC100 Chapter 2 THE ELEMENTS OF MUSIC The Elements of Music In music, the 3 basic elements are melody, rhythm, and harmony Melody - Melodies can be smooth or jagged, short or long, simple or complex - Popular melodies are an important element of all cultures - A melody typically consists of different types of melodic motion - Melodic motion describes the way the melody moves from note to note - Most melodies contain a mixture of steps (movement to adjacent notes), leaps (movement to notes more than a step away), and repeated notes - An important element of melody is shape - It is shape that makes melody interesting: V shape (angular), descending, wave…etc
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- The mixture of steps, leaps, and repeated notes known as melodic motion , and the division into phrases - They also demonstrate the concept of melodic shape and the idea of organizational form Pitch - Pitch is the term used to describe the exact highness or lowness of a note - Sound is created through vibrations - The rate (or “frequency”) at which the object vibrates determines the pitch that we hear - The faster the vibrations, the higher the pitch - Most differences in pitch are not so extreme; 2 adjacent notes on the piano may have a difference of only about 10 vibrations, but there is still a clear difference in pitch between them Note Names - We use the first seven letters of the alphabet to indicate notes: A, B, C, D, E, F, and G - The seven letter names are repeated again and again for notes of different frequencies - The C above middle C, has exactly twice the number of vibrations as middle C - These notes are very closely related in pitch; that is why they have the same name Intervals - The distance between any 2 pitches is called an interval - The closest possible interval is a unison ; a unison is made up of 2 notes on the same pitch - A half step is the distance between a white note on the piano and the adjacent black note - A whole step is the distance between one white note and the next, if there is a black note in between (some of the white notes do not have black notes between them. That is because they are only a half-step apart) - After the unison, the other intervals are the second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, and octave - If you count up to eight, you’ll get to another note of the same name (C up to C); the name of this interval is octave - We use the word sharp to indicate a note that is just a half step up from a particular note
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- We use the word flat to indicate a note that is just a half step down from a particular note - Look at the C#; now find Db; it’s the SAME NOTE! - Look again at those white notes that don’t have black notes between them; there is no black note between E and F, and there is no black note between B and C; so for example, E-sharp is the same as F, and Cb is the same as B - An interval is consonant when the 2 notes played together sound pleasing or stable - The most stable or consonant intervals are the unison, the fourth, the fifth and the octave; somewhat consonant are the third and the sixth
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This note was uploaded on 01/01/2011 for the course MUSIC 100 taught by Professor J during the Spring '10 term at American College of Computer & Information Sciences.

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MUSIC100 Chapter 2 - MUSIC100 Chapter 2 THE ELEMENTS OF...

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