{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

MUSIC100 Chapter 10 - M US IC100 Chapter 10 T H E N I N E T...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
MUSIC100 Chapter 10 THE NINETEENTH CENTURY II: MID-TO-LATE-ROMANTIC MUSIC - By the middle of the nineteenth century, the main aspects of musical Romanticism had become established: music should represent human emotions to the utmost, and it must tell a story or express an idea that is profound, resonant, or uplifting - A favourite term of the Romantics was “sublime,” which means grand, beyond normal experience, awe-inspiring - During the mid-Romantic period, from the 1850s to the 1870s, the most important musical genres were solo piano works, symphonic program music, and opera - The most important composers were Franz Liszt, Giuseppe Verdi, Richard Wagner, and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Works for Solo Piano - Solo piano music appealed to the Romantics because of its focus on the individual - This was the period during which the idea of the performer-hero first took hold, an idea that is still current today (witness our fascination with stars of both the rock and the classical worlds) - The great piano performer of the mid-Romantic period was Liszt Symphonic Program Music - Symphonic program music followed two paths during the 1850s and 1860s - The first was that of the programmatic symphony - The programmatic symphony is a full0length symphony, with each of its three to five movements depicting an episode in the narrative - The second path was that of the symphonic poem
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
- The symphonic poem is a single-movement self-contained work, also for orchestra and also programmatic Opera - During the nineteenth century, there were three national schools of opera: the French, the Italian, and the German - French opera had two very different genres, each with its own style and even its own opera house - The first was grand opera , which incorporated lofty subject matter and spectacular staging, including ballet, choruses, and crowd scenes - The second was opera comique (comic opera), with a much smaller cast and orchestra, simpler musical style, and more down-to-earth plots with humorous or romantic (love) interest - A technical distinction between grand opera and comic opera is that in grand opera the dialogue is set in accompanied musical recitative, whereas in comic opera the dialogue is spoken - By the 1850s and 1860s a new, highly popular operatic genre had evolved in France, one that stood between grand opera and comic opera, known as lyric opera - Lyric opera was melodious, as its name implies; its primary subject matter was tragic love; and its proportions lay somewhere between the spectacular and the skimpy - The greatest lyric opera is Carmen , written by Georges Bizet (1838-1875) - Carmen represented a turning point in the history of opera - With its realistic plot, down-to-earth characters, and turbulent passion, it set the stage for a new, more pointed approach to opera (known as verismo , or “realism”) toward the end of the nineteenth century - Italian opera was dominated by the achievements of one man: Giuseppe Verdi
Background image of page 2
- The central figure in German opera was Wagner, who created some of the most significant masterpieces of the entire nineteenth century, and whose
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}