Journal 2

Journal 2 - Journal Entry 2 William Byun Power of Words I...

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Journal Entry 2 William Byun Power of Words I was not born in 1963 when Martin Luther King was writing a letter to a clergyman at a jail in Birmingham. I do not know how terrible the racial discrimination was back in those days. Nonetheless, I could sympathize with the African-Americans, reading King’s words of earnest confessions. King bemoans the black and white society. The Caucasians maltreat the African- Americans only because they have different skin color. They never associate themselves with the African-Americans. They divide public places into two regions, one white-only, and the other colored-only. For example, there were two entrances in a movie theater: “white” and “colored.” I could truly hear King lamenting. King has stimulated the sentiments in me through the use of pathos. I was moved by “a five year old son” asking his father why the Caucasians “treat colored people so mean” in a family trip of “night after night in the uncomfortable corners” of their car due to every motel’s rejection (p. 3. line 146-148).
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This note was uploaded on 01/09/2011 for the course CAS WR 98 taught by Professor Finlayson during the Fall '10 term at BU.

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Journal 2 - Journal Entry 2 William Byun Power of Words I...

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