Geology _ Geophysics in Oil Exploration

Sometimesblocksmayslumpinthiszonewhichcalledinterblock

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Unformatted text preview: n Recumbent Fold: is overturned fold with an axial plane is nearly horizontal Box Fold: the crest is broad & flat Kink fold: narrow bands in which dip is steeper or gentler than adjacent beds Monocline: a local steeping of dip in area which has a very low dip Homocline: aren't really folds, rocks slopes in same direction over a large area. Open Fold: angle between the fold's limbs range from 120° to 70° Closed Fold: angle between the fold's limbs range from 70° to 30° Tight Fold: angle between the fold's limbs range from 30° to 0° Non Cylindrical: Curved hinge lines & does not contain fold axes Chevron Fold: planar limbs meeting at an angular axis (with straight limbs and small angular hinges & interlimb angles 70 to 10 degrees) • Parallel Fold: Thickness of beds is constant, where Similar Fold, limb thinning; hinge thickening 18 Geology & Geophysics in Oil Exploration Mahmoud Sroor Geology & Geophysics in Oil Exploration Examples for Folds: Anticline Syncline Isoclinal Overturned Recumbent Box Fold Kink Chevron Homocline Monocline Monocline 19 Geology & Geophysics in Oil Exploration Mahmoud Sroor Geology & Geophysics in Oil Exploration Folds in seismic sections: 20 Geology & Geophysics in Oil Exploration Mahmoud Sroor Geology & Geophysics in Oil Exploration Faults: Fault is a planar fracture in rock in which the rock on one side of the fracture has moved with respect to the rock on the other side. Large faults within the Earth's crust are the result of differential or shear motion and active fault zones are the causal locations of most earthquakes. Earthquakes are caused by energy release during rapid slippage along a fault. A fault that runs along the boundary between two tectonic plates is called a transform fault. Since faults do not usually consist of a single, clean fracture, the term fault zone is used when referring to the zone of complex deformation that is associated with the fault plane. The two sides of a non‐vertical fault are called the h...
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This note was uploaded on 01/05/2011 for the course GEOL 1 taught by Professor Jenniferalford during the Spring '10 term at Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee.

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