anth263 ethnographic paper

anth263 ethnographic paper - An Analysis of Becky Fischers...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
“An Analysis of Becky Fischer’s Evangelical Children’s Ministry” written by Natalie Del Favero November 17, 2010 ANTH 263: Exploring Culture Through Film Prof. Lanita Jacobs-Huey TA: Terrion Williamson 10am 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
“The most chilling horror movie of the year isn’t Hostel or The Descent : it’s Jesus Camp ” (Feinberg), says Lexi Feinberg of Cinema Blend review site. In an interview with co-director Rachel Grady, “One camp watches it [ Jesus Camp ] and want to send their kids to the camp; on the other end there are people who want to call the cops”(Glaister). Jesus Camp was the cause of a great flurry amongst spiritual people from all religious backgrounds. The film was released in 2006 under the direction of Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady; Jesus Camp reveals a community of Evangelical Christians from Kansas City, Missouri and highlights pastor Becky Fischer and her “Kids on Fire” campaign. Ewing and Grady take on a daring and controversial topic in their film Jesus Camp and explore the realms of indoctrination of children in Middle-America’s Evangelical Christian society via camera lens. The most surprising aspect of Ewing and Grady’s work is that they chose not to narrate the documentary. Instead, they relied on visuals to guide their film. This shows that the directors went about their project mostly detached from their subjects and arranged the film to be viewed from an etic perspective. In “The Ethics of Ethnographic Film-Making,” Timothy Asch gives pointers on how to make a successful documentary. The directors of Jesus Camp seem to have taken some of Asch’s advice by shooting whole events, seeking feedback from the subjects and seeing that their film was properly distributed (Asch, pg. 199-201). The film Jesus Camp opens with a radio talk-show host discussing the place of religion in American politics with his listeners. Ewing and Grady make a careful choice to graze the camera over McDonald’s classic golden arches, a few American flags, and 2
Background image of page 2
the two-sided highway in the vast Missouri countryside while the talk-show host rambles on about the separation between church and state. This choice of visuals is purely intentional in order to provide the viewer with the backdrop of mid-west Missouri and the ideals of its inhabitants. In “Visual Imperialism and the Export of Prejudice: An Exploration of Ethnographic Film,” Kathleen Kuehnast describes visual imperialism as
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/05/2011 for the course ANTH 263 at USC.

Page1 / 6

anth263 ethnographic paper - An Analysis of Becky Fischers...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online