Municipal waste notes

Municipal waste notes - In 2001, U.S. residents,...

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Source: US EPA - http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/muncpl/facts.htm In 2001, U.S. residents, businesses, and institutions produced more than 229 million tons of MSW, which is approximately 4.4 pounds of waste per person per day, up from 2.7 pounds per person per day in 1960.
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Solid waste is transferred from several collection vehicles to a larger vehicle at transfer stations. This permits an exchange in a rapid sanitary fashion and waste is carried to the disposal site. The larger vehicle may be a tractor-trailer, railroad car, or barge.
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Site Selection Considerations Public opposition Major roadways Road and bridge capacities Traffic patterns Hauling distance Climate Environmental factors (endangered species, historic buildings, wetlands, etc.)
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Restrictions Landfills should be more than: 30 m from streams 160 m from drinking wells 65 m houses, schools, and parks 3000 m from airports US EPA, under Subtitle D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), regulates landfills.
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This note was uploaded on 01/06/2011 for the course CE 350 taught by Professor Nies,l during the Spring '08 term at Purdue.

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Municipal waste notes - In 2001, U.S. residents,...

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