The Heterogeneous Nature of Butterfly Wing Patterns

The Heterogeneous Nature of Butterfly Wing Patterns - The...

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The Monarch Butterfly: Metamorphosis and Migration PPSC 110 Dr. Shelton 30 April 2010 Rebecca Leong PPSC 110 Writing Assignment 30 April 2010 1
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Metamorphosis and Migration of the Monarch Butterfly The Greek myth of King Danaus of Libya tells the story of his daughters fleeing Libya for Greece in order to escape their fate of marrying their cousins. The daughter’s flee from Libya is representative of the migration of the Monarch Butterfly, which is how this insect got its name, Danaus . The Monarch Butterfly is often referred to as the “King” of butterflies, hence the name “Monarch”. The Monarch Butterfly’s scientific name is Danaus plexippus , which means “sleepy transformation” in Greek. The scientific name describes a Monarch Butterfly’s metamorphism and ability to hibernate. (World Wildlife Fund 2010). The migration patterns, metamorphosis, and hibernation are all what make the Monarch Butterfly such an interesting insect to study. Monarch Butterflies are said to be one of the most beautiful of all butterflies because of their vibrant wing coloration. Adult Monarchs have two pairs of wings that vary in color from orange to reddish brown, with black veins and white dots around the edges. This wing coloration is what makes the Monarch Butterfly so easy to identify. Monarch Butterfly’s wing span is typically about four inches, but males are slightly bigger than females. Monarch butterflies wings are what enable them to migrate to
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This note was uploaded on 01/10/2011 for the course PPSC 110 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '04 term at Cal Poly.

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The Heterogeneous Nature of Butterfly Wing Patterns - The...

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