Hitlers Battle

Hitlers Battle - Leong 1 Com 331 3/11/10 The Rhetoric of Hi...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Leong 1 Com 331 3/11/10 The Rhetoric of Hitler’s Battle Kenneth Burke uses a unique analytical perspective in interpreting Hitler’s rhetoric. Most critics, in discussing Hitler’s literature or politics, describe him as being a dictator that led a population under false pretenses to the genocide of an innocent people. Instead of attacking and criticizing Hitler, Burke approaches his work in a logical manner. The basis of Burke’s argument about Hitler’s motives is that he was not justified, however, Hitler used thought out and practical reasoning. Burke analyzes in “The Rhetoric of Hitler’s Battle”, that Hitler’s method is a “cure-all” for what ails the Aryan population. Burke argues that Hitler uses reason to rationalize his destruction of the Jews. In the first part of Burke’s essay, he says that all leaders, including Hitler, must have a central point of reference in order for their followers to turn to. The first step in acquiring a following behind a movement calls for a focus point for people to identify with and for
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Leong 2 movement to grow. Burke talks about identification as needing both division and some basis for identification. Hitler chooses Munich as the foundation for his movement. Hitler says, “Only the presence of such a center and of a place bathed in the magic of a Mecca or a Rome, can at length give a movement that force which is rooted in the inner unity.” The identification with Mecca and Rome as being both religious centers, as well as dominant superpowers, allows Hitler to associate Munich with such affluence and strength. Hitler’s identification with Munich as the unifying center will not only align his followers to relate Munich to power and success, but relate themselves to each other on a common ground. Burke also discusses Hitler needing to unite his people on a mutual idea. Hitler does this by identifying Jews as “devils”. By creating a symbol of a common enemy people are more likely to unite against the Jews. Burke says, “Men who can unite on nothing else can unite on the basis of a foe shared by all.” Hitler uses Burke’s theory of identification against the Jews as a way to instill a sense of connection amongst the Aryan race. Burke’s idea of identification allows Hitler to unify his people in a central location as well as against a common enemy. In unifying his people, Hitler has a strong following behind his movement and can pursue his dream of decimating the Jewish population.
Background image of page 2
Leong 3 Burke, in his “Definition of Man” essay, discusses men as being a symbol-using animal. Burke contends that humans invent linguistic representations of objects, but often times we misuse symbols to incorrectly identify the term we are describing. Hitler utilizes
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/10/2011 for the course COMS 331 taught by Professor Duffy during the Winter '09 term at Cal Poly.

Page1 / 8

Hitlers Battle - Leong 1 Com 331 3/11/10 The Rhetoric of Hi...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online