EEE224_Fall09_farada - METU NCC EEE 224 ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY Faradays Law of Electromagnetic Induction 1 Fundamental Laws of Electrostatics

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1 EEE 224 ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY Faraday’s Law of Electromagnetic Induction METU - NCC
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2 : volume charge density (coul / m 3 ) in free space (or in vacuum) : permittivity of free-space 0 v E ρ ε ∇⋅ = 0 E ∇× = v 0 Fundamental Laws of Electrostatics Integral form Differential form 0 1 v SV E ds dv ⋅= ± 0 C Ed l ± 0 D E =
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3 : volume current density vector (A / m 2 ) : permeability of free-space H J ∇× = 0 B ∇⋅ = J 0 μ Fundamental Laws of Magnetostatics Integral form Differential form CS H dl J ds ⋅= ± 0 C Bd s ± 0 B H =
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4 ElectroMagnetoStatic Fields In the static case (no time variation), the electric field (specified by E and D ) and the magnetic field (specified by B and H ) are described by separate and independent sets of equations. (They are uncoupled.) In a conducting medium, both electrostatic and magnetostatic fields can exist, and are coupled through the Ohm’s law ( J = σ E ). Such a situation is called electromagnetostatic .
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5 Faraday’s Law of Induction Faraday’s law of induction: In 1831, Michael Faraday discovered that, by varying magnetic field with time, an electric field could be generated. The phenomenon is known as electromagnetic induction . dB E dt ∇× =− CS B Ed l d s t ∫∫ ± In integral form:
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6 One of Faraday’s experiments Faraday’s Law of Induction battery switch toroidal iron core compass primary coil secondary coil Upon closing the switch, current begins to flow in the primary coil . A momentary deflection of the compass needle indicates a brief surge of current flowing in the secondary coil . The compass needle quickly settles back to zero. Upon opening the switch, another brief deflection of the compass needle is observed.
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7 Faraday’s Law of Induction Faraday showed that no current is registered in the galvanometer when bar magnet is stationary with respect to the loop. However, a current is induced in the loop when a relative motion exists between the bar magnet and the loop. In particular, the galvanometer deflects in one direction as the magnet approaches the loop, and the opposite direction as it moves away.
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This note was uploaded on 01/07/2011 for the course EE 209 taught by Professor Alexander during the Spring '10 term at Middle East Technical University.

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EEE224_Fall09_farada - METU NCC EEE 224 ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY Faradays Law of Electromagnetic Induction 1 Fundamental Laws of Electrostatics

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