Phil 1001 Syllabus-1

Phil 1001 Syllabus-1 - Philosophy 1001 - 120/122 Fall 2010...

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Philosophy 1001 - 120/122 Fall 2010 Mr. Michael Anderson TR 11:00-12:15 / 12:30-1:45 Office: Coughlin 238 Office Hours: TR 9-10:30 and by appointment Course Description: In this course, we will examine issues concerning human nature, selfhood, and the relation between the individual and society. We will study the arguments and positions of selected thinkers from Greco- Roman, Chinese, and Indian traditions, with a focus on understanding why they held the positions they did and how we can apply their thinking to our own context. Required Texts: Readings for this course will include handouts, selections from public domain texts, and texts pulled from Marquette's library databases on ARES. The required book for the course will be Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy (ed. Ivanhoe and Van Norman). Course Objectives: By the end of the course, 1) The student will be able to state and provide reasons for basic positions concerning the relation between mind/soul and body, including the positions held by representative classical and Christian thinkers. In particular, we will discuss the difference between Plato, Aristotle, and Augustine on the nature of the soul, in contrast to the Buddhist tradition which denies all concept of a self and soul. 2) The student will be able to state and provide reasons for basic positions concerning the nature and possibility of knowledge, including positions held by representative classical and Christian thinkers. This will be studied in the context of the nature of the soul in the Platonic tradition, in contrast to the context of the social nature of knowledge and the role of ritual and nature in the classical Chinese tradition. 3) The student will be able to state and provide reasons for basic positions concerning the nature and possibility of freedom as it relates to human choice, including positions held by representative classical and Christian thinkers. We will spend time discussing Augustine's contribution on this matter in particular, followed by the role of education in the individual's freedom (the Chinese tradition) and the restrictions placed on personal freedom by one's notion of selfhood (the Buddhist tradition). 4) The student will be able to state and provide reasons for basic positions concerning fundamental features of human sociality, including positions held by representative classical and Christian thinkers. We will discuss the social dimensions of Plato, Aristotle, and Augustine, insofar as their view of the individual person and what it is to be human influences the structure of society. The role of education and ritual in the context of Chinese philosophy will also be discussed. 5) The student will be able to state and provide reasons for the position held by significant thinkers from outside the Western tradition on one (or more) of the following problems: the relation between mind/soul and body; the nature and possibility of knowledge; the nature and possibility of free human
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Phil 1001 Syllabus-1 - Philosophy 1001 - 120/122 Fall 2010...

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