Figures of Speech - Figures of Speech Puns: the humorous...

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Figures of Speech Puns: the humorous use of a word, or of words which are formed or sounded alike but have different meanings, in such a way as to play on two or more of the possible applications. American companies would like to sell their products to the Japanese. But the Japanese have no yen for American products. The choir wanted to perform the Hallelujah Chorus for Easter. But they soon discovered that they couldn’t handle it. Rhetorical Question: a question asked, as in oratory or writing, only for rhetorical effect, to emphasize a point, introduce a topic, etc., no answer being expected. The speaker/writer typically supplies the answer. What was President Clinton’s greatest strength? Parallelism: the repetition of the same grammatical unit for achieving rhetorical effect, for combining equal items, for producing rhythm, or for creating a climax. I am speaking, or course, about the neglect of our children, about the neglect of our nation’s greatest resource, about the careless neglect of our own future.
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This note was uploaded on 01/09/2011 for the course COMM 105 taught by Professor Bova during the Fall '10 term at Columbus State Community College.

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Figures of Speech - Figures of Speech Puns: the humorous...

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