human_to_human (2).docx - Project 3.3.3 Design of a Prosthetic Arm Part 21 Human to Human Interface Introduction It is not easy getting through the day

human_to_human (2).docx - Project 3.3.3 Design of a...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 8 pages.

Project 3.3.3 Design of a Prosthetic Arm Part 2 1 Human to Human Interface Introduction It is not easy getting through the day without the full use of an arm or hand. For much of what we do every day, we rely on our hands and arms. Imagine how different your life would be if you had to go about your day using a prosthetic arm to complete your daily tasks. We have previously discussed "neuroprosthetics," that is, designing a machine that interfaces with living neurons to control a device or for sensory substitution. But what about muscles? If people have damage to their spinal nerves, the muscles themselves can be stimulated, and this line of research is called "functional electrical stimulation. “For example, functional electrical stimulation can often be used to help someone stand up, or to improve walking by helping to swing a foot forward. From HBS you should remember that your brain is the control center of your nervous system and, along with your spinal cord, comprises the central nervous system (CNS). The interneurons in your brain are responsible for relaying the information gathered from the environment through sensory neurons, and coordinating the motor neurons that control conscious and unconscious body functions. In this activity, you will be linking your knowledge of the brain and arm from HBS with your newly learned neuroprosthetic information to “Take Someone’s Free Will” Equipment Computer with Internet access, BYB Spike Recorder App Connection Cable Laboratory journal Human to Human Interface Willing laboratory subjects Smartphone(optional) with headphone attachment. Procedure Part I: Reacquaint yourself with the brain and muscles. Almost all behavior involves motor function, from talking to gesturing to walking. However, even a simple movement like reaching out to pick up a glass of water can be a complex motor task to study. Not only does your brain have to figure out which muscles to contract and in which order to steer your hand to the glass, it also has to estimate the force needed to pick up the glass. Other factors, like how much water is in the glass and what material the glass is made from, also influence the brains calculations. Not surprisingly, there are many anatomical regions that are involved in motor function. The primary motor cortex, or M1, is one of the principal brain areas involved in motor function. M1 is located in the frontal lobe of the brain, along a bump called the precentral gyrus . Using internet resources find M1 and label/ shade it on the diagram below. 1 Modified from:
Image of page 1
The role of the primary motor cortex is to generate neural impulses that control the execution of movement. Signals from M1 cross the bodies’ midline to activate skeletal muscles on the opposite side of the body,
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 8 pages?

  • Fall '16
  • Joseph Begeny
  • Ulnar nerve, Somatic motor system

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes