immune_bio8-1

immune_bio8-1 - The Immune Response: Learning Objectives...

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The Immune Response: Learning Objectives Define the pathogens the immune system copes with Be familiar with the differences between innate and adaptive immunity Be able to define immune memory and how it is accomplished Understand the concept of clonal selection Separate and understand the roles of cellular and humoral immunity in terms of cells involved, antigen receptors and development Understand the structure and function of the lymph system and traffic of lymphoid cells Understand the mechanisms by which the immune system may fail Be able to define how the immune response may cause disease
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Note to Students The immune response is overwhelmingly complex and is the subject of textbooks and year long courses Please consider this PowerPoint a “required reading” which will substitute for pages 53-57 in R&R (although that is a reasonable review for those who know the area). Do not hesitate to ask us questions about what you do not understand My talk is only a brief overview of this material But you do need some background to understand the next lecture!!!
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The Immune Response: Introduction (1) The Immune system plays an absolutely essential role in the protection of the organism from from pathogens -infectious foreign agents that cause disease. Traditionally pathogens are considered to be: Bacteria Viruses Fungi Parasites (which generally encompass) Unicellular protozoa Worms Insects (occasionally) The immune system also plays a critical role in the production of (and possibly defense against) neoplasia but we will not discuss that in any detail The immune system may lead to disease as a “side-effect” of appropriate function (or as a result of “malfunction”) This area is termed immunopathology
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The Immune Response: “Good &Bad” (2)
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The immune Response: Introduction (2) Evolution has driven the immune system to respond best to those pathogens encountered in the hosts’ natural environment. New pathogens introduced into an environment or movement of the host into a new environment may lead to failure of immune systems Bubonic plague : a possible result of increased trade in textiles and furs from China and Mongolia to Europe in the 14th century Smallpox and measles: introduced into the New World by colonial powers Syphilis: (probably!) introduced into Europe (Italy initially) from the New World in the 16th century AIDS being introduced widely from Central Africa in the 1970s (complex and controversial story) West Nile Virus: (probably) introduced into NYC about 2000 (Bronx Zoo?) Bird Flu….??????? With time both the pathogen and host immune system moderate to reach a balanced accommodation. The pathogen becomes less so; the immune system more so
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Types of Immunity: Innate (Natural) The immune system responds to pathogens using two mechanisms, the innate (sometimes called natural ) and the adaptive immune response (sometimes called
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This note was uploaded on 01/09/2011 for the course PATH 128 taught by Professor Reisner during the Fall '10 term at UNC.

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immune_bio8-1 - The Immune Response: Learning Objectives...

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